Afterload and the failing heart

Karl Weber, J. S. Janicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A great deal has been learned recently about the forces that influence the pump function of the heart. Because it is a muscle, the pumping action of the heart is not simply a function of contractility and resistance to outflow. Other factors such as chamber size at any given moment during the cardiac cycle play a role. Although possibly difficult for those trained in traditional concepts of cardiac dynamics to grasp at first, a thorough understanding of the forces at work in the failing heart is essential to a rational approach to therapy. In this article, Drs. Weber and Janicki discuss the concept of afterload (it is more than simply arterial resistance) and how it relates to cardiac function and therapy in the failing heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-45
Number of pages11
JournalPractical Cardiology
Volume6
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Muscles
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Weber, K., & Janicki, J. S. (1980). Afterload and the failing heart. Practical Cardiology, 6(11), 35-45.

Afterload and the failing heart. / Weber, Karl; Janicki, J. S.

In: Practical Cardiology, Vol. 6, No. 11, 01.01.1980, p. 35-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weber, K & Janicki, JS 1980, 'Afterload and the failing heart', Practical Cardiology, vol. 6, no. 11, pp. 35-45.
Weber K, Janicki JS. Afterload and the failing heart. Practical Cardiology. 1980 Jan 1;6(11):35-45.
Weber, Karl ; Janicki, J. S. / Afterload and the failing heart. In: Practical Cardiology. 1980 ; Vol. 6, No. 11. pp. 35-45.
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