Age and hemispheric asymmetry in nonverbal tactual memory

Walter H. Riege, E. Metter, Michael Virtue Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The left and the right hand recognition of 120 age-differentiated volunteers (20 to 84 yr) were tested separately in a recurrent tactual recognition task using four non-meaningful wire shapes as targets among a 24-item distractor series. Signal detection measures of tactual memory were found to be progressively lower with age. Young persons of age range 20-29 and 30-39 yr showed a right hemisphere superiority which was considerably reduced in old persons (60-69, and over 70). The results suggested that loss in asymmetry can be ascribed to an age decrement in the ability of the right hemisphere to process tactual memory to which the left hemisphere has access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-710
Number of pages4
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Age and hemispheric asymmetry in nonverbal tactual memory. / Riege, Walter H.; Metter, E.; Williams, Michael Virtue.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.01.1980, p. 707-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riege, Walter H. ; Metter, E. ; Williams, Michael Virtue. / Age and hemispheric asymmetry in nonverbal tactual memory. In: Neuropsychologia. 1980 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 707-710.
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