Age and species-dependent differences in the neurokinin B system in rat and human brain

Darinka Mileusnic, D. J. Magnuson, M. J. Hejna, J. B. Lorens, S. A. Lorens, J. M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurokinin B and its cognate neurokinin-3 receptor are expressed more in the forebrain than in brain stem structures but little is known about the primary function of this peptide system in the central processing of information. In general, few studies have specifically addressed age-related changes of tachykinins, notably the changes in number and/or distribution of the neurokinin B-expressing and neurokinin-3 receptor-bearing neurons. Data on functions and changes of neurokinins in physiological aging are limited and apply mainly to the substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor system. In the present study, we analyzed neurokinin B/neurokinin-3 receptor system in young (5 months) versus middle aged (15 months) and old rats (23-25 months) and also in aging human brains. For the majority of the immunohistochemically examined regions of the rat brain, there was no statistically significant change in neuronal number and size of the neurokinin B and neurokinin-3 receptor staining. In the adult human brain, there was no age-associated change of the number or size of neurokinin-B-positive neurons. However, we found a major decline in number of neurokinin-3 receptor-expressing neurons between young/middle aged (30 years to 69 years) versus old (70 years and older) adults. Interestingly, numbers of neurokinin-3 receptor-positive microglia increased whereas the neurokinin-3 receptor-positive astrocytes remained unchanged in both aging rat and human brains. Finally, in addition to assessing the morphological and quantitative changes of the neurokinin B/neurokinin-3 receptor system in the rat and human brain, we discuss functional implications of the observed interspecies differences. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-35
Number of pages17
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurokinin-3 Receptors
Neurokinin B
Brain
Neurons
Neurokinin-1 Receptors
Tachykinins
Microglia
Substance P
Prosencephalon
Automatic Data Processing
Astrocytes
Brain Stem
Staining and Labeling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Aging
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Age and species-dependent differences in the neurokinin B system in rat and human brain. / Mileusnic, Darinka; Magnuson, D. J.; Hejna, M. J.; Lorens, J. B.; Lorens, S. A.; Lee, J. M.

In: Neurobiology of Aging, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.1999, p. 19-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mileusnic, Darinka ; Magnuson, D. J. ; Hejna, M. J. ; Lorens, J. B. ; Lorens, S. A. ; Lee, J. M. / Age and species-dependent differences in the neurokinin B system in rat and human brain. In: Neurobiology of Aging. 1999 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 19-35.
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