Age‐Progressive Changes in Pulp Widths and Root Lengths During Adulthood

A Study of American Blacks and Whites

Marjorie Woods, Quinton C. Robinson, Edward Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intertwined effects of normal aging processes and time‐progressive diseases produce systematic changes in many oral and dental tissues. This cross‐sectional study of pulp dimensions and root lengths in sound teeth tested for changes with age in adulthood while controlling for differences in gender and race (black, white). Age was the paramount determinant of pulp size which decreases via the accumulation of secondary dentin. In some instances the rate of change increases in older adults with an inflection point at 35–40 years of age. In contrast, root lengths are statistically independent of age once gender (male > female) and race (black > white) are controlled. Causes of the lack of association with age are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-50
Number of pages10
JournalGerodontology
Volume9
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Secondary Dentin
Tooth
hydroquinone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Age‐Progressive Changes in Pulp Widths and Root Lengths During Adulthood : A Study of American Blacks and Whites. / Woods, Marjorie; Robinson, Quinton C.; Harris, Edward.

In: Gerodontology, Vol. 9, No. 1-3, 01.01.1990, p. 41-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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