Aging and apoptosis in muscle

Stephen Alway, Michael R. Morissette, Parco M. Siu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The loss of muscle mass and strength with age is associated with increased mortality and increased incidence of falling and hip fractures. Although the mechanisms leading to sarcopenia are multifactorial, apoptosis has been shown to be part of the events that lead to muscle loss with aging. This chapter explores apoptosis and it role in old age. Cardiovascular dysfunction and, particularly, heart failure further contribute to the geriatric syndrome of frailty, thereby severely limiting the function, the quality of life, and the life expectancy of the elderly who have these health problems. Apoptosis is a fundamental biological process that is highly conserved among species ranging from worms to humans. The steps in apoptosis that lead to the eventual elimination of cells from tissues require ATP. The sequential events in apoptosis were first described in the nematode Caenorhabditiselegans. The distinctive morphological characteristics of apoptosis include cell shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, internucleosomal degradation of chromosomal DNA, and formation of membrane bound fragments called apoptotic bodies. The morphological and biochemical characteristics of apoptosis are unique and clearly distinguish it from necrotic cell death. Data obtained in the past 2 decades have provided a better understanding of the biological role of apoptosis. Apoptosis is necessary for the elimination of damaged, aberrant, or harmful cells. Apoptosis also participates in normal embryonic development, tissue turnover, and immunological function. Apoptosis regulates part of the balance among cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell death in multicellular organisms. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that health would be threatened if apoptosis is not adequately maintained or if it is disrupted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of the Biology of Aging
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages63-118
Number of pages56
ISBN (Print)9780123786388
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Apoptosis
Muscles
Cell Death
Accidental Falls
Sarcopenia
Biological Phenomena
Health
Hip Fractures
Muscle Strength
Blister
Life Expectancy
Geriatrics
Chromatin
Embryonic Development
Cell Differentiation
Heart Failure
Adenosine Triphosphate
Quality of Life
Cell Proliferation
Cell Membrane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Alway, S., Morissette, M. R., & Siu, P. M. (2011). Aging and apoptosis in muscle. In Handbook of the Biology of Aging (pp. 63-118). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-378638-8.00004-X

Aging and apoptosis in muscle. / Alway, Stephen; Morissette, Michael R.; Siu, Parco M.

Handbook of the Biology of Aging. Elsevier Inc., 2011. p. 63-118.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Alway, S, Morissette, MR & Siu, PM 2011, Aging and apoptosis in muscle. in Handbook of the Biology of Aging. Elsevier Inc., pp. 63-118. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-378638-8.00004-X
Alway S, Morissette MR, Siu PM. Aging and apoptosis in muscle. In Handbook of the Biology of Aging. Elsevier Inc. 2011. p. 63-118 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-378638-8.00004-X
Alway, Stephen ; Morissette, Michael R. ; Siu, Parco M. / Aging and apoptosis in muscle. Handbook of the Biology of Aging. Elsevier Inc., 2011. pp. 63-118
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