Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

The primary care goal

Greg Mattingly, Larry Culpepper, Thomas Babcock, Valerie Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often undiagnosed and undertreated in adults, resulting in wide-ranging problems and functional deficits in patients’ lives. In addition, psychiatric comorbidities unrelated to symptom severity may be present. However, effective treatment that can alleviate symptoms and bring about meaningful improvements in functionality is available. Primary care providers can play a crucial role in recognizing and diagnosing ADHD, initiating and monitoring treatment, and obtaining consultations or arranging referrals when necessary, all with the goal of achieving and maintaining remission. Fulfillment of this role requires a practical understanding of the diverse clinical manifestations of ADHD in patients stratified by age and sex, and familiarity with current treatment guidelines. Although there is no absolute consensus on the criteria by which remission is defined, treatment response may be guided by objective ratings of global symptom severity and patients’ self-reports of changes in their ability to cope with routine daily tasks, academic and vocational responsibilities, and social relationships. Although there has been much research into the genetic and neurophysiologic basis of ADHD, it is more important for primary care providers to appreciate that ADHD is a chronic condition requiring lifelong follow-up and that clinical presentation and response to treatment can vary widely among patients and over time in the same patients. Such variability makes the management of ADHD challenging, but the opportunity to bring about dramatic improvement in patients’ lives makes it imperative for primary care providers to be competent in this area. This review provides primary care clinicians with a practical definition of remission in adults with ADHD, to emphasize that symptom reduction does not necessarily mean intact functionality, and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach aimed at achieving the greatest possible reduction of symptoms and normalization of functionality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-329
Number of pages7
JournalPostgraduate medicine
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Therapeutics
Genetic Research
Aptitude
Self Report
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Consensus
Guidelines

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : The primary care goal. / Mattingly, Greg; Culpepper, Larry; Babcock, Thomas; Arnold, Valerie.

In: Postgraduate medicine, Vol. 127, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 323-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Mattingly, Greg ; Culpepper, Larry ; Babcock, Thomas ; Arnold, Valerie. / Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder : The primary care goal. In: Postgraduate medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 127, No. 3. pp. 323-329.
@article{df8b7c7be4ea4a9685acf9c67c45d231,
title = "Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: The primary care goal",
abstract = "Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often undiagnosed and undertreated in adults, resulting in wide-ranging problems and functional deficits in patients’ lives. In addition, psychiatric comorbidities unrelated to symptom severity may be present. However, effective treatment that can alleviate symptoms and bring about meaningful improvements in functionality is available. Primary care providers can play a crucial role in recognizing and diagnosing ADHD, initiating and monitoring treatment, and obtaining consultations or arranging referrals when necessary, all with the goal of achieving and maintaining remission. Fulfillment of this role requires a practical understanding of the diverse clinical manifestations of ADHD in patients stratified by age and sex, and familiarity with current treatment guidelines. Although there is no absolute consensus on the criteria by which remission is defined, treatment response may be guided by objective ratings of global symptom severity and patients’ self-reports of changes in their ability to cope with routine daily tasks, academic and vocational responsibilities, and social relationships. Although there has been much research into the genetic and neurophysiologic basis of ADHD, it is more important for primary care providers to appreciate that ADHD is a chronic condition requiring lifelong follow-up and that clinical presentation and response to treatment can vary widely among patients and over time in the same patients. Such variability makes the management of ADHD challenging, but the opportunity to bring about dramatic improvement in patients’ lives makes it imperative for primary care providers to be competent in this area. This review provides primary care clinicians with a practical definition of remission in adults with ADHD, to emphasize that symptom reduction does not necessarily mean intact functionality, and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach aimed at achieving the greatest possible reduction of symptoms and normalization of functionality.",
author = "Greg Mattingly and Larry Culpepper and Thomas Babcock and Valerie Arnold",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00325481.2015.1012481",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "127",
pages = "323--329",
journal = "Postgraduate Medicine",
issn = "0032-5481",
publisher = "Medquest Communications LLC",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aiming for remission in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

T2 - The primary care goal

AU - Mattingly, Greg

AU - Culpepper, Larry

AU - Babcock, Thomas

AU - Arnold, Valerie

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often undiagnosed and undertreated in adults, resulting in wide-ranging problems and functional deficits in patients’ lives. In addition, psychiatric comorbidities unrelated to symptom severity may be present. However, effective treatment that can alleviate symptoms and bring about meaningful improvements in functionality is available. Primary care providers can play a crucial role in recognizing and diagnosing ADHD, initiating and monitoring treatment, and obtaining consultations or arranging referrals when necessary, all with the goal of achieving and maintaining remission. Fulfillment of this role requires a practical understanding of the diverse clinical manifestations of ADHD in patients stratified by age and sex, and familiarity with current treatment guidelines. Although there is no absolute consensus on the criteria by which remission is defined, treatment response may be guided by objective ratings of global symptom severity and patients’ self-reports of changes in their ability to cope with routine daily tasks, academic and vocational responsibilities, and social relationships. Although there has been much research into the genetic and neurophysiologic basis of ADHD, it is more important for primary care providers to appreciate that ADHD is a chronic condition requiring lifelong follow-up and that clinical presentation and response to treatment can vary widely among patients and over time in the same patients. Such variability makes the management of ADHD challenging, but the opportunity to bring about dramatic improvement in patients’ lives makes it imperative for primary care providers to be competent in this area. This review provides primary care clinicians with a practical definition of remission in adults with ADHD, to emphasize that symptom reduction does not necessarily mean intact functionality, and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach aimed at achieving the greatest possible reduction of symptoms and normalization of functionality.

AB - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often undiagnosed and undertreated in adults, resulting in wide-ranging problems and functional deficits in patients’ lives. In addition, psychiatric comorbidities unrelated to symptom severity may be present. However, effective treatment that can alleviate symptoms and bring about meaningful improvements in functionality is available. Primary care providers can play a crucial role in recognizing and diagnosing ADHD, initiating and monitoring treatment, and obtaining consultations or arranging referrals when necessary, all with the goal of achieving and maintaining remission. Fulfillment of this role requires a practical understanding of the diverse clinical manifestations of ADHD in patients stratified by age and sex, and familiarity with current treatment guidelines. Although there is no absolute consensus on the criteria by which remission is defined, treatment response may be guided by objective ratings of global symptom severity and patients’ self-reports of changes in their ability to cope with routine daily tasks, academic and vocational responsibilities, and social relationships. Although there has been much research into the genetic and neurophysiologic basis of ADHD, it is more important for primary care providers to appreciate that ADHD is a chronic condition requiring lifelong follow-up and that clinical presentation and response to treatment can vary widely among patients and over time in the same patients. Such variability makes the management of ADHD challenging, but the opportunity to bring about dramatic improvement in patients’ lives makes it imperative for primary care providers to be competent in this area. This review provides primary care clinicians with a practical definition of remission in adults with ADHD, to emphasize that symptom reduction does not necessarily mean intact functionality, and to suggest a multidisciplinary approach aimed at achieving the greatest possible reduction of symptoms and normalization of functionality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964050104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964050104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00325481.2015.1012481

DO - 10.1080/00325481.2015.1012481

M3 - Review article

VL - 127

SP - 323

EP - 329

JO - Postgraduate Medicine

JF - Postgraduate Medicine

SN - 0032-5481

IS - 3

ER -