Airway injuries

The first priority in trauma

William Edwards, J. A. Morris, J. B. DeLozier, R. B. Adkins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    During the last 12 years, 20 patients with significant airway injuries have been treated for lesions involving the trachea, larynx, and/or bronchus. Fourteen of the injuries were the result of penetrating wounds, nine gunshot wounds, and five stab wounds. Six patients presented with blunt trauma, four as a result of motor vehicle accidents, one from a clothesline injury, and one from a crush injury. Sixteen of the 20 were males; average age was 29.6 years. Eleven patients had injuries involving only the trachea, six had isolated laryngeal injuries, two had bronchial injuries, and one patient had a combined injury of the trachea and larynx. Eleven had subcutaneous emphysema, four had hemoptysis, and three stable patients experienced sudden respiratory arrest while being evaluated for the repair of their injuries. Twelve patients required immediate intubation or tracheostomy. Most airway injuries were closed primarily. In one instance segmental resection of a perforated trachea and primary anastomosis was necessary. Two patients died after proper management of the airway injury. One died of an associated brain stem injury and the other of profuse hemorrhage from a liver injury. Of the 18 surviving patients, all but two recovered totally without residual impairment. Described here is a protocol for the evaluation and immediate treatment of airway injuries that is consistent with the guidelines of the Subcommittee of Advanced Trauma Life Support of the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma. Aggressive initial management, high index of suspicion for injury, and meticulous repair of the injured airway are equally important steps in the successful management of these patients.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)192-197
    Number of pages6
    JournalAmerican Surgeon
    Volume53
    Issue number4
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

    Fingerprint

    Wounds and Injuries
    Trachea
    Larynx
    Advanced Trauma Life Support Care
    Penetrating Wounds
    Stab Wounds
    Subcutaneous Emphysema
    Gunshot Wounds
    Airway Management
    Hemoptysis
    Tracheostomy
    Motor Vehicles
    Bronchi
    Intubation
    Brain Injuries
    Brain Stem
    Accidents
    Guidelines
    Hemorrhage
    Liver

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Edwards, W., Morris, J. A., DeLozier, J. B., & Adkins, R. B. (1987). Airway injuries: The first priority in trauma. American Surgeon, 53(4), 192-197.

    Airway injuries : The first priority in trauma. / Edwards, William; Morris, J. A.; DeLozier, J. B.; Adkins, R. B.

    In: American Surgeon, Vol. 53, No. 4, 01.01.1987, p. 192-197.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Edwards, W, Morris, JA, DeLozier, JB & Adkins, RB 1987, 'Airway injuries: The first priority in trauma', American Surgeon, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 192-197.
    Edwards W, Morris JA, DeLozier JB, Adkins RB. Airway injuries: The first priority in trauma. American Surgeon. 1987 Jan 1;53(4):192-197.
    Edwards, William ; Morris, J. A. ; DeLozier, J. B. ; Adkins, R. B. / Airway injuries : The first priority in trauma. In: American Surgeon. 1987 ; Vol. 53, No. 4. pp. 192-197.
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