Aldosterone and antialdosterone therapy in congestive heart failure

Karl Weber, Daniel Villarreal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pathophysiologic cycle that links myocardial failure with the appearance of congestive heart failure is not fully understood. It is clear, however, that an activation of several neurohormonal systems and the interplay between kidneys, adrenal glands, and heart contribute to abnormal sodium and water homeostasis. Aldosterone, the body's most potent mineralocorticoid hormone, contributes to intravascular and extravascular volume expansion, and thus to the appearance of symptomatic failure. Antialdosterone therapy in patients with secondary hyperaldosteronism due to heart failure must achieve one or more of the following goals: reduce or, preferably, normalize plasma aldosterone levels by limiting synthesis; antagonize the renal and systemic effects of aldosterone at its receptor sites; and eliminate or minimize the multiple stimuli to aldosterone secretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Aldosterone
Heart Failure
Kidney
Mineralocorticoids
Hyperaldosteronism
Therapeutics
Adrenal Glands
Homeostasis
Sodium
Hormones
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Aldosterone and antialdosterone therapy in congestive heart failure. / Weber, Karl; Villarreal, Daniel.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 71, No. 3, 21.01.1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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