Alemtuzumab in clinical practice

A British Columbia experience

David Hui, Wendy Lam, Cynthia Toze, Michael Delorme, Michael Noble, Paul Klimo, Judy Sutherland, Karamjit Gill, Joseph Connors, Laurie Sehn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited information is available on alemtuzumab in the nonclinical trial setting. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in 42 consecutive unselected patients who received alemtuzumab monotherapy in British Columbia between October 2002 and August 2006. Information on patient demographics, baseline clinical characteristics, dose and schedule, clinical response, survival, and toxicities associated with alemtuzumab was collected retrospectively. Thirty-nine of 42 patients had chronic lymphocytic leukemia, two had mycosis fungoides, and one had T-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. In contrast to previous reports, 42% were treated by community practitioners and 83% received alemtuzumab subcutaneously. The median time from diagnosis to alemtuzumab was 58 months. One of 42 patients (2%) achieved a complete response, 20 (48%) achieved a partial response, and 13 (31%) had stable disease. The post-alemtuzumab median overall survival was 15.1 months. Response to alemtuzumab correlated with an increased progression-free survival (11 vs. 3.6 months, p = 0.001) compared to that seen in non-responders. Significant adverse events included grade 3/4 neutropenia (76%), thrombocytopenia (45%), infections (60%) and death (12%). With careful monitoring, alemtuzumab can be safely administered in a wide variety of clinical settings, including community practice, and is associated with a high level of activity in situations with few available alternative treatment options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-226
Number of pages9
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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British Columbia
Mycosis Fungoides
Survival
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
alemtuzumab
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Neutropenia
Thrombocytopenia
Disease-Free Survival
Appointments and Schedules
Demography
T-Lymphocytes
Transplants
Safety
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Hui, D., Lam, W., Toze, C., Delorme, M., Noble, M., Klimo, P., ... Sehn, L. (2008). Alemtuzumab in clinical practice: A British Columbia experience. Leukemia and Lymphoma, 49(2), 218-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/10428190701760029

Alemtuzumab in clinical practice : A British Columbia experience. / Hui, David; Lam, Wendy; Toze, Cynthia; Delorme, Michael; Noble, Michael; Klimo, Paul; Sutherland, Judy; Gill, Karamjit; Connors, Joseph; Sehn, Laurie.

In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.02.2008, p. 218-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hui, D, Lam, W, Toze, C, Delorme, M, Noble, M, Klimo, P, Sutherland, J, Gill, K, Connors, J & Sehn, L 2008, 'Alemtuzumab in clinical practice: A British Columbia experience', Leukemia and Lymphoma, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 218-226. https://doi.org/10.1080/10428190701760029
Hui, David ; Lam, Wendy ; Toze, Cynthia ; Delorme, Michael ; Noble, Michael ; Klimo, Paul ; Sutherland, Judy ; Gill, Karamjit ; Connors, Joseph ; Sehn, Laurie. / Alemtuzumab in clinical practice : A British Columbia experience. In: Leukemia and Lymphoma. 2008 ; Vol. 49, No. 2. pp. 218-226.
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