"All children can and should have the opportunity to learn"

General education teachers' perspectives on including children with autism spectrum disorder who require AAC

Erinn Finke, David B. McNaughton, Kathryn D.R. Drager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A qualitative online focus group methodology was used to investigate the experiences of five elementary school teachers (grades K-5) who had included in their general education classrooms children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who required augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Information was obtained from the participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of educational inclusion, (b) the negative impacts of educational inclusion, (c) the challenges of educational inclusion, (d) the supports for educational inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and individuals involved in the inclusion process. Participants primarily chose to focus on inclusion as a beneficial practice for all involved, but did describe a few barriers and challenges of inclusion. The results are discussed as they relate to these themes and with reference to published literature. Recommendations for future directions are also presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-122
Number of pages13
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Focus Groups
Communication
Education
Direction compound
School Teachers
Autism Spectrum Disorder

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

@article{d2af5afca26446da819ae139e4ed92f9,
title = "{"}All children can and should have the opportunity to learn{"}: General education teachers' perspectives on including children with autism spectrum disorder who require AAC",
abstract = "A qualitative online focus group methodology was used to investigate the experiences of five elementary school teachers (grades K-5) who had included in their general education classrooms children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who required augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Information was obtained from the participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of educational inclusion, (b) the negative impacts of educational inclusion, (c) the challenges of educational inclusion, (d) the supports for educational inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and individuals involved in the inclusion process. Participants primarily chose to focus on inclusion as a beneficial practice for all involved, but did describe a few barriers and challenges of inclusion. The results are discussed as they relate to these themes and with reference to published literature. Recommendations for future directions are also presented.",
author = "Erinn Finke and McNaughton, {David B.} and Drager, {Kathryn D.R.}",
year = "2009",
month = "8",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/07434610902886206",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "110--122",
journal = "AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication",
issn = "0743-4618",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - "All children can and should have the opportunity to learn"

T2 - General education teachers' perspectives on including children with autism spectrum disorder who require AAC

AU - Finke, Erinn

AU - McNaughton, David B.

AU - Drager, Kathryn D.R.

PY - 2009/8/3

Y1 - 2009/8/3

N2 - A qualitative online focus group methodology was used to investigate the experiences of five elementary school teachers (grades K-5) who had included in their general education classrooms children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who required augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Information was obtained from the participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of educational inclusion, (b) the negative impacts of educational inclusion, (c) the challenges of educational inclusion, (d) the supports for educational inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and individuals involved in the inclusion process. Participants primarily chose to focus on inclusion as a beneficial practice for all involved, but did describe a few barriers and challenges of inclusion. The results are discussed as they relate to these themes and with reference to published literature. Recommendations for future directions are also presented.

AB - A qualitative online focus group methodology was used to investigate the experiences of five elementary school teachers (grades K-5) who had included in their general education classrooms children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who required augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Information was obtained from the participants in the following areas: (a) the benefits of educational inclusion, (b) the negative impacts of educational inclusion, (c) the challenges of educational inclusion, (d) the supports for educational inclusion, and (e) recommendations for other teachers and individuals involved in the inclusion process. Participants primarily chose to focus on inclusion as a beneficial practice for all involved, but did describe a few barriers and challenges of inclusion. The results are discussed as they relate to these themes and with reference to published literature. Recommendations for future directions are also presented.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67650284968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67650284968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07434610902886206

DO - 10.1080/07434610902886206

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 110

EP - 122

JO - AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

JF - AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

SN - 0743-4618

IS - 2

ER -