AltitudeOmics

The integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent

Andrew W. Subudhi, Nicolas Bourdillon, Jenna Bucher, Christopher Davis, Jonathan E. Elliott, Morgan Eutermoster, Oghenero Evero, Jui Lin Fan, Sonja Jameson-Van Houten, Colleen G. Julian, Jonathan Kark, Sherri Kark, Bengt Kayser, Julia P. Kern, See Eun Kim, Corinna Lathan, Steven S. Laurie, Andrew T. Lovering, Ryan Paterson, David M. Polaner & 5 others Benjamin J. Ryan, James L. Spira, Jack Tsao, Nadine B. Wachsmuth, Robert C. Roach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An understanding of human responses to hypoxia is important for the health of millions of people worldwide who visit, live, or work in the hypoxic environment encountered at high altitudes. In spite of dozens of studies over the last 100 years, the basic mechanisms controlling acclimatization to hypoxia remain largely unknown. The AltitudeOmics project aimed to bridge this gap. Our goals were 1) to describe a phenotype for successful acclimatization and assess its retention and 2) use these findings as a foundation for companion mechanistic studies. Our approach was to characterize acclimatization by measuring changes in arterial oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration [Hb], acute mountain sickness (AMS), cognitive function, and exercise performance in 21 subjects as they acclimatized to 5260 m over 16 days. We then focused on the retention of acclimatization by having subjects reascend to 5260 m after either 7 (n = 14) or 21 (n = 7) days at 1525 m. At 16 days at 5260 m we observed: 1) increases in arterial oxygenation and [Hb] (compared to acute hypoxia: PaO 2 rose 9±4 mmHg to 45±4 while PaCO2 dropped a further 6±3 mmHg to 21±3, and [Hb] rose 1.8±0.7 g/dL to 16±2 g/dL; 2) no AMS; 3) improved cognitive function; and 4) improved exercise performance by 8±8% (all changes p<0.01). Upon reascent, we observed retention of arterial oxygenation but not [Hb], protection from AMS, retention of exercise performance, less retention of cognitive function; and noted that some of these effects lasted for 21 days. Taken together, these findings reveal new information about retention of acclimatization, and can be used as a physiological foundation to explore the molecular mechanisms of acclimatization and its retention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere92191
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2014

Fingerprint

human physiology
Oxygenation
Acclimatization
Physiology
hypoxia
acclimation
Altitude Sickness
cognition
Cognition
exercise
mountains
Hemoglobins
Rosa
Health
Hypoxia
hemoglobin
Phenotype
phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Subudhi, A. W., Bourdillon, N., Bucher, J., Davis, C., Elliott, J. E., Eutermoster, M., ... Roach, R. C. (2014). AltitudeOmics: The integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent. PloS one, 9(3), [e92191]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0092191

AltitudeOmics : The integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent. / Subudhi, Andrew W.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Bucher, Jenna; Davis, Christopher; Elliott, Jonathan E.; Eutermoster, Morgan; Evero, Oghenero; Fan, Jui Lin; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Kark, Jonathan; Kark, Sherri; Kayser, Bengt; Kern, Julia P.; Kim, See Eun; Lathan, Corinna; Laurie, Steven S.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Paterson, Ryan; Polaner, David M.; Ryan, Benjamin J.; Spira, James L.; Tsao, Jack; Wachsmuth, Nadine B.; Roach, Robert C.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 3, e92191, 21.03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Subudhi, AW, Bourdillon, N, Bucher, J, Davis, C, Elliott, JE, Eutermoster, M, Evero, O, Fan, JL, Jameson-Van Houten, S, Julian, CG, Kark, J, Kark, S, Kayser, B, Kern, JP, Kim, SE, Lathan, C, Laurie, SS, Lovering, AT, Paterson, R, Polaner, DM, Ryan, BJ, Spira, JL, Tsao, J, Wachsmuth, NB & Roach, RC 2014, 'AltitudeOmics: The integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 3, e92191. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0092191
Subudhi, Andrew W. ; Bourdillon, Nicolas ; Bucher, Jenna ; Davis, Christopher ; Elliott, Jonathan E. ; Eutermoster, Morgan ; Evero, Oghenero ; Fan, Jui Lin ; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja ; Julian, Colleen G. ; Kark, Jonathan ; Kark, Sherri ; Kayser, Bengt ; Kern, Julia P. ; Kim, See Eun ; Lathan, Corinna ; Laurie, Steven S. ; Lovering, Andrew T. ; Paterson, Ryan ; Polaner, David M. ; Ryan, Benjamin J. ; Spira, James L. ; Tsao, Jack ; Wachsmuth, Nadine B. ; Roach, Robert C. / AltitudeOmics : The integrative physiology of human acclimatization to hypobaric hypoxia and its retention upon reascent. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 3.
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