Aluminum‐induced neo‐osteogenesis

A generalized process affecting trabecular networking in the axial skeleton

Leigh Quarles, Gayle Murphy, James B. Vogler, Marc K. Drezner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine if aluminum‐induced neo‐osteogenesis occurs in the axial skeleton, we compared spinal bone density and vertebral histology of beagles treated with aluminum for 8 and 16 weeks to that of untreated normals. Administration of aluminum (1.25 mg/kg) did not alter serum calcium, phosphorus, or creatinine but did result in a significant elevation of vertebral bone density, measured by quantitative computed tomography, after both 8 (286.7 ± 12.4 mg/ml) and 16 (361.7 ± 46.5 mg/ml) weeks of treatment compared with controls (212.2 ± 4.5 mg/ml). In accord with the increased bone density, biopsies from the spine displayed evidence of neo‐osteogenesis, including the presence of woven bone, both mineralized and unmineralized, within the marrow space. The genesis of such woven bone units resulted after 16 weeks in a significant increase in trabecular bone volume, woven and lamellar (51.2 ± 4.4 versus 32.4 ± 1.2%; p < 0.05), woven bone volume (9.1 ± 3.6 versus 0 ± 0%; p < 0.05), and trabecular number (4.5 ± 0.3 versus 3.5 ± 0.2 per mm; p < 0.05). In addition, scanning electron microscopic evaluation of the bone biopsies confirmed the existence of new trabecular plates that provided interconnections between existent units. These observations illustrate that aluminum‐induced neo‐osteogenesis positively influences trabecular networking in the axial skeleton. Such enhancement of bone histogenesis contrasts with the effects of other pharmacologic agents that solely alter the thickness of existing trabecular plates or rods within the vertebral spongiosa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-635
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Skeleton
Bone and Bones
Bone Density
Aluminum
Biopsy
Phosphorus
Creatinine
Histology
Spine
Bone Marrow
Tomography
Electrons
Calcium
Serum
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Aluminum‐induced neo‐osteogenesis : A generalized process affecting trabecular networking in the axial skeleton. / Quarles, Leigh; Murphy, Gayle; Vogler, James B.; Drezner, Marc K.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 5, No. 6, 01.01.1990, p. 625-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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