Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Children at Risk for Hypertension

Phyllis Richey, Thomas G. DiSessa, Margaret C. Hastings, Grant W. Somes, Bruce S. Alpert, Deborah P. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To relate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) to cardiac target organ measurement in children at risk for primary hypertension (HTN). Study design: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and ABP were measured concomitantly in children (6 to 18 years) at risk for hypertension using a cross-sectional study design. Results: LVMI showed a significant positive correlation with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) load, SBP index (SBPI), and standard deviation score (SDS). When subjects were stratified by LVMI percentile, there were significant differences in SBP load, 24-hour SBPI, and 24-hour SSDS. The odds ratio (OR) of having elevated LVMI increased by 54% for each incremental increase of SDS in 24-hour SSDS after controlling for race and BMI (OR = 1.54, unit = 1 SDS, CI = 1.1, 2.15, P = .011) and increased by 88% for each increase of 0.1 in BPI (OR = 1.88, CI = 1.03, 3.45, P = .04). Subjects with stage 3 HTN had significantly greater mean LVMI compared with normal subjects (P = .002 by ANOVA; LMVI, 31.6 ± 7.9 versus 39.5 ± 10.4). Conclusions: As systolic ABP variables increase, there is greater likelihood for increased LVMI. Staging based on ABPM allows assessment of cardiovascular risk in children with primary hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-348
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume152
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Fingerprint

Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Odds Ratio
Analysis of Variance
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Children at Risk for Hypertension. / Richey, Phyllis; DiSessa, Thomas G.; Hastings, Margaret C.; Somes, Grant W.; Alpert, Bruce S.; Jones, Deborah P.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 152, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 343-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richey, Phyllis ; DiSessa, Thomas G. ; Hastings, Margaret C. ; Somes, Grant W. ; Alpert, Bruce S. ; Jones, Deborah P. / Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Children at Risk for Hypertension. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2008 ; Vol. 152, No. 3. pp. 343-348.
@article{f21671233d5240778c6a12af8d5da0c0,
title = "Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Children at Risk for Hypertension",
abstract = "Objective: To relate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) to cardiac target organ measurement in children at risk for primary hypertension (HTN). Study design: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and ABP were measured concomitantly in children (6 to 18 years) at risk for hypertension using a cross-sectional study design. Results: LVMI showed a significant positive correlation with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) load, SBP index (SBPI), and standard deviation score (SDS). When subjects were stratified by LVMI percentile, there were significant differences in SBP load, 24-hour SBPI, and 24-hour SSDS. The odds ratio (OR) of having elevated LVMI increased by 54{\%} for each incremental increase of SDS in 24-hour SSDS after controlling for race and BMI (OR = 1.54, unit = 1 SDS, CI = 1.1, 2.15, P = .011) and increased by 88{\%} for each increase of 0.1 in BPI (OR = 1.88, CI = 1.03, 3.45, P = .04). Subjects with stage 3 HTN had significantly greater mean LVMI compared with normal subjects (P = .002 by ANOVA; LMVI, 31.6 ± 7.9 versus 39.5 ± 10.4). Conclusions: As systolic ABP variables increase, there is greater likelihood for increased LVMI. Staging based on ABPM allows assessment of cardiovascular risk in children with primary hypertension.",
author = "Phyllis Richey and DiSessa, {Thomas G.} and Hastings, {Margaret C.} and Somes, {Grant W.} and Alpert, {Bruce S.} and Jones, {Deborah P.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "152",
pages = "343--348",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Increased Left Ventricular Mass in Children at Risk for Hypertension

AU - Richey, Phyllis

AU - DiSessa, Thomas G.

AU - Hastings, Margaret C.

AU - Somes, Grant W.

AU - Alpert, Bruce S.

AU - Jones, Deborah P.

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - Objective: To relate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) to cardiac target organ measurement in children at risk for primary hypertension (HTN). Study design: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and ABP were measured concomitantly in children (6 to 18 years) at risk for hypertension using a cross-sectional study design. Results: LVMI showed a significant positive correlation with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) load, SBP index (SBPI), and standard deviation score (SDS). When subjects were stratified by LVMI percentile, there were significant differences in SBP load, 24-hour SBPI, and 24-hour SSDS. The odds ratio (OR) of having elevated LVMI increased by 54% for each incremental increase of SDS in 24-hour SSDS after controlling for race and BMI (OR = 1.54, unit = 1 SDS, CI = 1.1, 2.15, P = .011) and increased by 88% for each increase of 0.1 in BPI (OR = 1.88, CI = 1.03, 3.45, P = .04). Subjects with stage 3 HTN had significantly greater mean LVMI compared with normal subjects (P = .002 by ANOVA; LMVI, 31.6 ± 7.9 versus 39.5 ± 10.4). Conclusions: As systolic ABP variables increase, there is greater likelihood for increased LVMI. Staging based on ABPM allows assessment of cardiovascular risk in children with primary hypertension.

AB - Objective: To relate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) to cardiac target organ measurement in children at risk for primary hypertension (HTN). Study design: Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and ABP were measured concomitantly in children (6 to 18 years) at risk for hypertension using a cross-sectional study design. Results: LVMI showed a significant positive correlation with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) load, SBP index (SBPI), and standard deviation score (SDS). When subjects were stratified by LVMI percentile, there were significant differences in SBP load, 24-hour SBPI, and 24-hour SSDS. The odds ratio (OR) of having elevated LVMI increased by 54% for each incremental increase of SDS in 24-hour SSDS after controlling for race and BMI (OR = 1.54, unit = 1 SDS, CI = 1.1, 2.15, P = .011) and increased by 88% for each increase of 0.1 in BPI (OR = 1.88, CI = 1.03, 3.45, P = .04). Subjects with stage 3 HTN had significantly greater mean LVMI compared with normal subjects (P = .002 by ANOVA; LMVI, 31.6 ± 7.9 versus 39.5 ± 10.4). Conclusions: As systolic ABP variables increase, there is greater likelihood for increased LVMI. Staging based on ABPM allows assessment of cardiovascular risk in children with primary hypertension.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39049132152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=39049132152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.014

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.014

M3 - Article

VL - 152

SP - 343

EP - 348

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

IS - 3

ER -