Amoxicillin use during early childhood and fluorosis of later developing tooth zones

Liang Hong, Steven M. Levy, John J. Warren, Barbara Broffitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Amoxicillin use has been reported to be associated with developmental defects on enamel surfaces. This analysis assessed the association between amoxicillin use and fluorosis on late-erupting permanent teeth. Methods: As part of the Iowa Fluoride Study, subjects were followed from birth to 32 months with questionnaires every 3-4 months to gather information on fluoride intake and amoxicillin use (n = 357 subjects for this analysis). Permanent tooth fluorosis on late-erupting zones was assessed by three trained dentists using the fluorosis risk index (FRI) at approximately age 13. A case was defined as fluorosis if a subject had at least two FRI classification II zone scores of 2 or 3. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used, and relative risks (RRs) and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. Results: There were 113 cases and 244 controls. In bivariate analyses, amoxicillin use from 20 to 24 months significantly increased the risk of fluorosis on FRI classification II zones [44.2 percent versus 30.4 percent, [RR = 1.45, 95 percent confidence interval (CI) 1.05-2.04], but other individual time periods did not. Multivariable logistic regression confirmed the increased risk of fluorosis for amoxicillin use from 20 to 24 months (OR = 2.92, 95 percent CI = 1.34-6.40), after controlling for otitis media, breast-feeding, and fluoride intake. Conclusions: Amoxicillin use during early childhood could be a risk factor in the etiology of fluorosis on late-erupting permanent tooth zones, but further research is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-235
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Public Health Dentistry
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

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Amoxicillin
Tooth
Odds Ratio
Fluorides
Logistic Models
Confidence Intervals
Otitis Media
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Enamel
Breast Feeding
Dentists
Parturition
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Amoxicillin use during early childhood and fluorosis of later developing tooth zones. / Hong, Liang; Levy, Steven M.; Warren, John J.; Broffitt, Barbara.

In: Journal of Public Health Dentistry, Vol. 71, No. 3, 01.06.2011, p. 229-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hong, Liang ; Levy, Steven M. ; Warren, John J. ; Broffitt, Barbara. / Amoxicillin use during early childhood and fluorosis of later developing tooth zones. In: Journal of Public Health Dentistry. 2011 ; Vol. 71, No. 3. pp. 229-235.
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