An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America

Nickalus R. Khan, Hassan Saad, Chesney S. Oravec, Sebastian P. Norrdahl, Brittany Fraser, David Wallace, Jock C. Lillard, Mustafa Motiwala, Vincent N. Nguyen, Siang Liao Lee, Anna V. Jones, Sonia Ajmera, Piyush Kalakoti, Pooja Dave, Kenneth A. Moore, Olutomi Akinduro, Emmanuel Nyenwe, Brandy Vaughn, L. Madisonmichael, Paul Klimo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. OBJECTIVE: To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environmentwithin residency programs. METHODS: During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to programdirectors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. RESULTS: The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident indexwere 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. Therewas a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P<.001). Scholarly activity requirementswere not associated with increased resident academic productivity. CONCLUSION: This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-867
Number of pages11
JournalClinical neurosurgery
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Internship and Residency
North America
Bibliometrics
Publications
Authorship
Literature
Benchmarking
Neurosurgery
Research
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America. / Khan, Nickalus R.; Saad, Hassan; Oravec, Chesney S.; Norrdahl, Sebastian P.; Fraser, Brittany; Wallace, David; Lillard, Jock C.; Motiwala, Mustafa; Nguyen, Vincent N.; Lee, Siang Liao; Jones, Anna V.; Ajmera, Sonia; Kalakoti, Piyush; Dave, Pooja; Moore, Kenneth A.; Akinduro, Olutomi; Nyenwe, Emmanuel; Vaughn, Brandy; Madisonmichael, L.; Klimo, Paul.

In: Clinical neurosurgery, Vol. 84, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 857-867.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, NR, Saad, H, Oravec, CS, Norrdahl, SP, Fraser, B, Wallace, D, Lillard, JC, Motiwala, M, Nguyen, VN, Lee, SL, Jones, AV, Ajmera, S, Kalakoti, P, Dave, P, Moore, KA, Akinduro, O, Nyenwe, E, Vaughn, B, Madisonmichael, L & Klimo, P 2019, 'An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America' Clinical neurosurgery, vol. 84, no. 4, pp. 857-867. https://doi.org/10.1093/neuros/nyy217
Khan, Nickalus R. ; Saad, Hassan ; Oravec, Chesney S. ; Norrdahl, Sebastian P. ; Fraser, Brittany ; Wallace, David ; Lillard, Jock C. ; Motiwala, Mustafa ; Nguyen, Vincent N. ; Lee, Siang Liao ; Jones, Anna V. ; Ajmera, Sonia ; Kalakoti, Piyush ; Dave, Pooja ; Moore, Kenneth A. ; Akinduro, Olutomi ; Nyenwe, Emmanuel ; Vaughn, Brandy ; Madisonmichael, L. ; Klimo, Paul. / An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America. In: Clinical neurosurgery. 2019 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 857-867.
@article{384c3f64aa8342619b7356fdea4dfc3b,
title = "An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. OBJECTIVE: To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environmentwithin residency programs. METHODS: During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to programdirectors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. RESULTS: The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident indexwere 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. Therewas a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P<.001). Scholarly activity requirementswere not associated with increased resident academic productivity. CONCLUSION: This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.",
author = "Khan, {Nickalus R.} and Hassan Saad and Oravec, {Chesney S.} and Norrdahl, {Sebastian P.} and Brittany Fraser and David Wallace and Lillard, {Jock C.} and Mustafa Motiwala and Nguyen, {Vincent N.} and Lee, {Siang Liao} and Jones, {Anna V.} and Sonia Ajmera and Piyush Kalakoti and Pooja Dave and Moore, {Kenneth A.} and Olutomi Akinduro and Emmanuel Nyenwe and Brandy Vaughn and L. Madisonmichael and Paul Klimo",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/neuros/nyy217",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "857--867",
journal = "Clinical Neurosurgery",
issn = "0148-396X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An analysis of publication productivity during residency for 1506 neurosurgical residents and 117 residency departments in North America

AU - Khan, Nickalus R.

AU - Saad, Hassan

AU - Oravec, Chesney S.

AU - Norrdahl, Sebastian P.

AU - Fraser, Brittany

AU - Wallace, David

AU - Lillard, Jock C.

AU - Motiwala, Mustafa

AU - Nguyen, Vincent N.

AU - Lee, Siang Liao

AU - Jones, Anna V.

AU - Ajmera, Sonia

AU - Kalakoti, Piyush

AU - Dave, Pooja

AU - Moore, Kenneth A.

AU - Akinduro, Olutomi

AU - Nyenwe, Emmanuel

AU - Vaughn, Brandy

AU - Madisonmichael, L.

AU - Klimo, Paul

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. OBJECTIVE: To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environmentwithin residency programs. METHODS: During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to programdirectors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. RESULTS: The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident indexwere 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. Therewas a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P<.001). Scholarly activity requirementswere not associated with increased resident academic productivity. CONCLUSION: This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.

AB - BACKGROUND: Bibliometrics is defined as the study of statistical and mathematical methods used to quantitatively analyze scientific literature. The application of bibliometrics in neurosurgery continues to evolve. OBJECTIVE: To calculate a number of publication productivity measures for almost all neurosurgical residents and departments within North America. These measures were correlated with survey results on the educational environmentwithin residency programs. METHODS: During May to June 2017, data were collected from departmental websites and Scopus to compose a bibliometric database of neurosurgical residents and residency programs. Data related to authorship value and study content were collected on all articles published by residents. A survey of residency program research and educational environment was administered to programdirectors and coordinators; results were compared with resident academic productivity. RESULTS: The median number of publications in residency was 3; median h-index and Resident indexwere 1 and 0.17 during residency, respectively. Therewas a statistically significant difference in academic productivity among male neurosurgical residents compared with females. The majority of articles published were tier 1 clinical articles. Residency program research support was significantly associated with increased resident productivity (P<.001). Scholarly activity requirementswere not associated with increased resident academic productivity. CONCLUSION: This study represents the most comprehensive bibliometric assessment of neurosurgical resident academic productivity during training to date. New benchmarks for individual and department academic productivity are provided. A supportive research environment for neurosurgical residents is associated with increased academic productivity, but a scholarly activity requirement was, surprisingly, not shown to have a positive effect.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055753758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85055753758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/neuros/nyy217

DO - 10.1093/neuros/nyy217

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 857

EP - 867

JO - Clinical Neurosurgery

JF - Clinical Neurosurgery

SN - 0148-396X

IS - 4

ER -