An Analysis of the On-Call Clinical Experience of a Junior Neurosurgical Resident

William E. Gordon, Andrew J. Gienapp, Morgan Jones, Lattimore Michael, Paul Klimo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The process of transforming a medical student to a competent neurosurgeon is becoming increasingly scrutinized and formalized. However, there are few data on resident workload. We sought to quantify the workload and educational experience of a junior resident while "on-call." A single resident's on-call log was reviewed from the period of July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2016, corresponding to that resident's postgraduate years 2 and 3. For each patient encounter (ie, consult or admission), information pertaining to the patient's demographics, disease or reason for consult, date/time/location of consult, and need for any neurosurgical intervention within the first 24 hours was collected. In total, 1929 patients were seen in consultation. The majority of patients were male (62%) with a median age of 50 years (range, day of life 0-102 years) and had traumatic diagnoses (52%). The number of consults received during the 16:00 to 17:00 and 17:00 to 18:00 hours was +1.6 and +2.5 standard deviations above the mean, respectively. The busiest and slowest months were May and January, respectively. Neurosurgical intervention performed within the first 24 hours of consultation occurred in 330 (17.1%) patients: 221 (11.4%) major operations, 69 (3.6%) external ventricular drains, and 40 (2.1%) intracranial pressure monitors. This is the first study to quantify the workload and educational experience of a typical neurosurgical junior resident while "on-call" (ie, carrying the pager) for 2 consecutive years. It is our hope that these findings are considered by neurosurgical educators when refining resident education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)290-297
Number of pages8
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Workload
Referral and Consultation
Intracranial Pressure
Medical Students
Demography
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

An Analysis of the On-Call Clinical Experience of a Junior Neurosurgical Resident. / Gordon, William E.; Gienapp, Andrew J.; Jones, Morgan; Michael, Lattimore; Klimo, Paul.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 85, No. 2, 01.08.2019, p. 290-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gordon, William E. ; Gienapp, Andrew J. ; Jones, Morgan ; Michael, Lattimore ; Klimo, Paul. / An Analysis of the On-Call Clinical Experience of a Junior Neurosurgical Resident. In: Neurosurgery. 2019 ; Vol. 85, No. 2. pp. 290-297.
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