An epidemiological study of hyperdontia in American blacks and whites

Edward Harris, Larkin L. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the null hypothesis that American blacks do not have a higher frequency of extra permanent teeth than whites. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of adolescent orthodontic patients, either American whites (n = 1100) or American blacks (n = 600), were reviewed systematically. Results: The frequencies of supernumerary incisors, premolars, and molars were each significantly more common in blacks. While incisors are the most common extra teeth in whites (and extra molars are least common), just the opposite ranking occurs in blacks. Overall, the odds ratio was 8.8 (95% confidence limits = 3.9, 20.0), confirming that American blacks are significantly more likely (almost 9 times more likely) to possess extra permanent teeth than American whites. Conclusions: The hypothesis is rejected. Both the frequencies and the patterns of extra permanent teeth are significantly different in blacks and whites, suggesting different frequencies of the relevant (but unidentified) factors governing the developmental mechanisms that result in hyperdontia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)460-465
Number of pages6
JournalAngle Orthodontist
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Fingerprint

Epidemiologic Studies
Tooth
Incisor
Bicuspid
Orthodontics
Odds Ratio
hydroquinone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

An epidemiological study of hyperdontia in American blacks and whites. / Harris, Edward; Clark, Larkin L.

In: Angle Orthodontist, Vol. 78, No. 3, 01.05.2008, p. 460-465.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{785253ed2e5d4677827c054411448f48,
title = "An epidemiological study of hyperdontia in American blacks and whites",
abstract = "Objective: To test the null hypothesis that American blacks do not have a higher frequency of extra permanent teeth than whites. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of adolescent orthodontic patients, either American whites (n = 1100) or American blacks (n = 600), were reviewed systematically. Results: The frequencies of supernumerary incisors, premolars, and molars were each significantly more common in blacks. While incisors are the most common extra teeth in whites (and extra molars are least common), just the opposite ranking occurs in blacks. Overall, the odds ratio was 8.8 (95{\%} confidence limits = 3.9, 20.0), confirming that American blacks are significantly more likely (almost 9 times more likely) to possess extra permanent teeth than American whites. Conclusions: The hypothesis is rejected. Both the frequencies and the patterns of extra permanent teeth are significantly different in blacks and whites, suggesting different frequencies of the relevant (but unidentified) factors governing the developmental mechanisms that result in hyperdontia.",
author = "Edward Harris and Clark, {Larkin L.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2319/022807-104.1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "78",
pages = "460--465",
journal = "Angle Orthodontist",
issn = "0003-3219",
publisher = "E H Angle Orthodontists Research & Education Foundation, Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An epidemiological study of hyperdontia in American blacks and whites

AU - Harris, Edward

AU - Clark, Larkin L.

PY - 2008/5/1

Y1 - 2008/5/1

N2 - Objective: To test the null hypothesis that American blacks do not have a higher frequency of extra permanent teeth than whites. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of adolescent orthodontic patients, either American whites (n = 1100) or American blacks (n = 600), were reviewed systematically. Results: The frequencies of supernumerary incisors, premolars, and molars were each significantly more common in blacks. While incisors are the most common extra teeth in whites (and extra molars are least common), just the opposite ranking occurs in blacks. Overall, the odds ratio was 8.8 (95% confidence limits = 3.9, 20.0), confirming that American blacks are significantly more likely (almost 9 times more likely) to possess extra permanent teeth than American whites. Conclusions: The hypothesis is rejected. Both the frequencies and the patterns of extra permanent teeth are significantly different in blacks and whites, suggesting different frequencies of the relevant (but unidentified) factors governing the developmental mechanisms that result in hyperdontia.

AB - Objective: To test the null hypothesis that American blacks do not have a higher frequency of extra permanent teeth than whites. Materials and Methods: Panoramic radiographs of adolescent orthodontic patients, either American whites (n = 1100) or American blacks (n = 600), were reviewed systematically. Results: The frequencies of supernumerary incisors, premolars, and molars were each significantly more common in blacks. While incisors are the most common extra teeth in whites (and extra molars are least common), just the opposite ranking occurs in blacks. Overall, the odds ratio was 8.8 (95% confidence limits = 3.9, 20.0), confirming that American blacks are significantly more likely (almost 9 times more likely) to possess extra permanent teeth than American whites. Conclusions: The hypothesis is rejected. Both the frequencies and the patterns of extra permanent teeth are significantly different in blacks and whites, suggesting different frequencies of the relevant (but unidentified) factors governing the developmental mechanisms that result in hyperdontia.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43449133035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43449133035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2319/022807-104.1

DO - 10.2319/022807-104.1

M3 - Article

VL - 78

SP - 460

EP - 465

JO - Angle Orthodontist

JF - Angle Orthodontist

SN - 0003-3219

IS - 3

ER -