An examination of college student wellness

A research and liberal arts perspective

Debora R. Baldwin, Kerry Towler, Michael D. Oliver, Subimal Datta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Promoting wellness within academia reduces disease frequency and enhances overall health. This study examined wellness factors among undergraduate students attending a research university (n = 85) or a small liberal arts college (n = 126). Participants were administered surveys which measured physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and occupational wellness. Significant institutional differences emerged on measures of physical and social wellness. When collapsed across academic institutions, students who were gainfully employed reported greater self-efficacy compared with unemployed students. Gender differences emerged on measures of physical and social well-being. Our findings support the need for targeted interventions that facilitate enhanced college student development and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Psychology Open
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Art
Students
Research
Self Efficacy
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

An examination of college student wellness : A research and liberal arts perspective. / Baldwin, Debora R.; Towler, Kerry; Oliver, Michael D.; Datta, Subimal.

In: Health Psychology Open, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baldwin, Debora R. ; Towler, Kerry ; Oliver, Michael D. ; Datta, Subimal. / An examination of college student wellness : A research and liberal arts perspective. In: Health Psychology Open. 2017 ; Vol. 4, No. 2.
@article{d9481ed819644fa6b21cb5caef611524,
title = "An examination of college student wellness: A research and liberal arts perspective",
abstract = "Promoting wellness within academia reduces disease frequency and enhances overall health. This study examined wellness factors among undergraduate students attending a research university (n = 85) or a small liberal arts college (n = 126). Participants were administered surveys which measured physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and occupational wellness. Significant institutional differences emerged on measures of physical and social wellness. When collapsed across academic institutions, students who were gainfully employed reported greater self-efficacy compared with unemployed students. Gender differences emerged on measures of physical and social well-being. Our findings support the need for targeted interventions that facilitate enhanced college student development and well-being.",
author = "Baldwin, {Debora R.} and Kerry Towler and Oliver, {Michael D.} and Subimal Datta",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/2055102917719563",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
journal = "Health Psychology Open",
issn = "2055-1029",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An examination of college student wellness

T2 - A research and liberal arts perspective

AU - Baldwin, Debora R.

AU - Towler, Kerry

AU - Oliver, Michael D.

AU - Datta, Subimal

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Promoting wellness within academia reduces disease frequency and enhances overall health. This study examined wellness factors among undergraduate students attending a research university (n = 85) or a small liberal arts college (n = 126). Participants were administered surveys which measured physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and occupational wellness. Significant institutional differences emerged on measures of physical and social wellness. When collapsed across academic institutions, students who were gainfully employed reported greater self-efficacy compared with unemployed students. Gender differences emerged on measures of physical and social well-being. Our findings support the need for targeted interventions that facilitate enhanced college student development and well-being.

AB - Promoting wellness within academia reduces disease frequency and enhances overall health. This study examined wellness factors among undergraduate students attending a research university (n = 85) or a small liberal arts college (n = 126). Participants were administered surveys which measured physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and occupational wellness. Significant institutional differences emerged on measures of physical and social wellness. When collapsed across academic institutions, students who were gainfully employed reported greater self-efficacy compared with unemployed students. Gender differences emerged on measures of physical and social well-being. Our findings support the need for targeted interventions that facilitate enhanced college student development and well-being.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050755216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85050755216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/2055102917719563

DO - 10.1177/2055102917719563

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Health Psychology Open

JF - Health Psychology Open

SN - 2055-1029

IS - 2

ER -