An experimental canine model of osteonecrosis

Characterization of the repair process

Konstantinos N. Malizos, Leigh Quarles, Anthony V. Seaber, Wagdy S. Rizk, James R. Urbaniak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in dogs by a process of deep freezing, accompanied by stripping of the soft‐tissue attachments from the femoral neck and intertrochanteric area, in an effort to develop an experimental model to study treatment modalities for avascular necrosis of the hip. Immediate uniform necrosis was created in a defined area. Thereafter, spontaneous healing originated mainly from the adjacent viable bone by migration of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue into the necrotic bone, genesis of fibrosis, and, finally, formation of new bone. Osteogenesis occurred primarily through intramembranous ossification without a preexisting template. Quantitative measurements showed a difference in the rates of ingrowth and revascularization of the necrotic area during the fibrotic and osteogenic phases of the healing. The de novo osteogenesis was slower than the migration of fibrosis. These findings indicate that, without osteotomy, we can reproducibly create necrosis of bone in a defined area of the proximal femur and induce a reparative process that incompletely heals the defect. Although it does not fully simulate the human disorder of osteonecrosis, our experimental surgical model provides a basis for further laboratory investigation into the management of avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-357
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Osteonecrosis
Osteogenesis
Canidae
Theoretical Models
Fibrosis
Necrosis
Femur Head Necrosis
Anatomic Models
Bone and Bones
Femur Neck
Osteotomy
Thigh
Femur
Freezing
Hip
Dogs
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

An experimental canine model of osteonecrosis : Characterization of the repair process. / Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Quarles, Leigh; Seaber, Anthony V.; Rizk, Wagdy S.; Urbaniak, James R.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 350-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malizos, Konstantinos N. ; Quarles, Leigh ; Seaber, Anthony V. ; Rizk, Wagdy S. ; Urbaniak, James R. / An experimental canine model of osteonecrosis : Characterization of the repair process. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Research. 1993 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 350-357.
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