An inhalation model of airway allergic response to inhalation of environmental Aspergillus fumigatus conidia in sensitized BALB/c mice

Scott A. Hoselton, Amali Samarasinghe, Jena M. Seydel, Jane M. Schuh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fungal exposure may elicit a number of pulmonary diseases in man, including allergic asthma. Fungal sensitization is linked to asthma severity, although the basis for this increased pathology remains ambiguous. To create conditions simulating environmental fungal allergen exposure in a human, nose-only inhalation delivery of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia was employed in mice previously sensitized to Aspergillus antigen extract. BALB/c mice were immunized with subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injections of soluble A. fumigatus extract in alum, which was followed by three intranasal inoculations of the same fungal antigens dissolved in saline to elicit global sensitization in a manner similar to other published models. The animals were then challenged with a 10-min inhaled dose of live conidia blown directly from the surface of a mature A. fumigatus culture. After a single challenge with inhaled A. fumigatus conidia, allergic pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were significantly increased above that of either nave animals or animals that had been sensitized to A. fumigatus antigens but not challenged with conidia. The architecture of the lung was changed by inhalation of conidia when compared to controls in that there were significant increases in epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, and peribronchial collagen deposition. Additionally, α-smooth muscle actin staining of histological sections showed visual evidence of increased peribronchial smooth muscle mass after fungal challenge. In summary, the delivery of live A. fumigatus conidia to the sensitized airways of BALB/c mice advances the study of the pulmonary response to fungi by providing a more natural route of exposure and, for the first time, demonstrates the consistent development of fibrosis and smooth muscle changes accompanying exposure to inhaled fungal conidia in a mouse model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1056-1065
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Mycology
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Fingerprint

Aspergillus fumigatus
Fungal Spores
Inhalation
conidia
breathing
mice
smooth muscle
Smooth Muscle
lungs
asthma
fungal antigens
Fungal Antigens
Asthma
antigens
Antigens
exposure pathways
metaplasia
Lung
animals
alum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

An inhalation model of airway allergic response to inhalation of environmental Aspergillus fumigatus conidia in sensitized BALB/c mice. / Hoselton, Scott A.; Samarasinghe, Amali; Seydel, Jena M.; Schuh, Jane M.

In: Medical Mycology, Vol. 48, No. 8, 01.12.2010, p. 1056-1065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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