An international survey of female dental students' perceptions about gender bias and sexual misconduct at four dental schools

Chris Ivanoff, Diana M. Luan, Timothy Hottel, Bogomil Andonov, Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato, Reena R. Kumar, Mark Scarbecz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

As women enter the dental profession in increasing numbers in North America and around the world, the questions of how they perceive their environment and what kind of barriers they face are important subjects to be addressed. The aim of this study was to assess and compare women dental students' perceptions of bias in their environment and experiences of sexual misconduct at one dental school in each of four countries. In spring 2017, 1,293 female students at four dental schools in the U.S., Bulgaria, Brazil, and India were invited to participate in a 24-item survey developed by researchers from the four countries; 990 students responded (response rate 76.6%). The overall majority of the respondents reported thinking the admissions process at their school was fair (79.7%); but a fifth of U.S. and Brazilian students perceived their school was not fully embracing of females, with most Bulgarian students agreeing (87.2%) and all Indian students disagreeing. Most respondents overall perceived that male faculty members did not favor male students (79.5%) and did not think there was discrimination against female students by faculty (87.1%), but half of the U.S. respondents reported feeling discriminated against by both male faculty and male students. When the responses "I've been verbally harassed" and "I've been somewhat verbally harassed" were combined, 10.1% of the U.S. respondents reported verbal harassment, compared to 20% of Brazilian, 15% of Bulgarian, and 2% of Indian respondents. When the responses "I've been sexually assaulted" and "I've been somewhat sexually assaulted" were combined, 6% of U.S. respondents reported being sexually assaulted, compared to 6.2% of Brazilian, 2.5% of Bulgarian, and none of the Indian respondents. Almost half (46.9%) of these students overall perceived their school was not or only somewhat vigilant about issues of sexual misconduct, and only 54% said they would feel comfortable or very comfortable reporting misconduct. These results suggest that academic dental institutions in all four countries need improvements to make their environments more equitable and free of bias and sexual misconduct.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1022-1035
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of dental education
Volume82
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Sexism
Dental Students
Dental Schools
Students
gender
trend
school
student
female student
Tooth
Surveys and Questionnaires
Bulgaria
North America
Brazil
discrimination
India
profession
Emotions
Research Personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

An international survey of female dental students' perceptions about gender bias and sexual misconduct at four dental schools. / Ivanoff, Chris; Luan, Diana M.; Hottel, Timothy; Andonov, Bogomil; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Kumar, Reena R.; Scarbecz, Mark.

In: Journal of dental education, Vol. 82, No. 10, 01.10.2018, p. 1022-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ivanoff, Chris ; Luan, Diana M. ; Hottel, Timothy ; Andonov, Bogomil ; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci ; Kumar, Reena R. ; Scarbecz, Mark. / An international survey of female dental students' perceptions about gender bias and sexual misconduct at four dental schools. In: Journal of dental education. 2018 ; Vol. 82, No. 10. pp. 1022-1035.
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