An update on the current management of perforated diverticulitis

Evon Zoog, W. Heath Giles, Robert Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The management of perforated diverticulitis is a challenging aspect of general surgery. The prevalence of colonic diverticular disease has increased over the last decade and will continue to increase as the baby boomers add to the elderly population. Improvements in diagnostic imaging modalities, efforts to maintain intestinal continuity, and percutaneous drainage procedures now result in several alternatives when selecting a management strategy for complicated presentations. Specifically, laparoscopic lavage and resection with primary anastomosis have emerged as options for treatment of Hinchey III and IV diverticulitis in place of diversion in the appropriately selected patient. Percutaneous drainage of Hinchey II diverticulitis in centers equipped with interventional radiology provides another minimally invasive adjunct. The objective of this paper is to provide an update on the current management of perforated diverticulitis, with a focus on the advantages and disadvantages of the surgical options for the treatment of Hinchey III and IV diverticulitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1321-1328
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume83
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Diverticulitis
Drainage
Colonic Diseases
Interventional Radiology
Therapeutic Irrigation
Diagnostic Imaging
Therapeutics
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

An update on the current management of perforated diverticulitis. / Zoog, Evon; Heath Giles, W.; Maxwell, Robert.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 83, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1321-1328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zoog, E, Heath Giles, W & Maxwell, R 2017, 'An update on the current management of perforated diverticulitis', American Surgeon, vol. 83, no. 12, pp. 1321-1328.
Zoog, Evon ; Heath Giles, W. ; Maxwell, Robert. / An update on the current management of perforated diverticulitis. In: American Surgeon. 2017 ; Vol. 83, No. 12. pp. 1321-1328.
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