Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women

Lauren C. Peres, Fabian Camacho, Sarah E. Abbott, Anthony J. Alberg, Elisa V. Bandera, Jill Barnholtz-Sloan, Melissa Bondy, Michele L. Cote, Sydnee Crankshaw, Ellen Funkhouser, Patricia G. Moorman, Edward S. Peters, Ann G. Schwartz, Paul Terry, Frances Wang, Joellen M. Schildkraut

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Existing literature examining analgesic medication use and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk has been inconsistent, with the majority of studies reporting an inverse association. Race-specific effects of this relationship have not been adequately addressed.Methods:Utilising data from the largest population-based case-control study of EOC in African Americans, the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study, the relationship between analgesic use (aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen) and risk of EOC was estimated by multivariate logistic regression. The association of frequency, duration, and indication of analgesic use on EOC risk was also assessed.Results:Aspirin use, overall, was associated with a 44% lower EOC risk (OR=0.56; 95% CI=0.35-0.92) and a 26% lower EOC risk was observed for non-aspirin NSAID use (OR=0.74; 95% CI=0.52-1.05). The inverse association was strongest for women taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease and women taking non-aspirin NSAIDs for arthritis. Significantly decreased EOC risks were observed for low-dose aspirin use, daily aspirin use, aspirin use for <5 years, and occasional non-aspirin NSAID use for a duration of ≥5 years. No association was observed for acetaminophen use.Conclusions:Collectively, these findings support previous evidence that any NSAID use is inversely associated with EOC risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-825
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume114
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Analgesics
Aspirin
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Acetaminophen
Ovarian epithelial cancer
Arthritis
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Peres, L. C., Camacho, F., Abbott, S. E., Alberg, A. J., Bandera, E. V., Barnholtz-Sloan, J., ... Schildkraut, J. M. (2016). Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. British Journal of Cancer, 114(7), 819-825. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2016.39

Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. / Peres, Lauren C.; Camacho, Fabian; Abbott, Sarah E.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michele L.; Crankshaw, Sydnee; Funkhouser, Ellen; Moorman, Patricia G.; Peters, Edward S.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Terry, Paul; Wang, Frances; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 114, No. 7, 01.03.2016, p. 819-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peres, LC, Camacho, F, Abbott, SE, Alberg, AJ, Bandera, EV, Barnholtz-Sloan, J, Bondy, M, Cote, ML, Crankshaw, S, Funkhouser, E, Moorman, PG, Peters, ES, Schwartz, AG, Terry, P, Wang, F & Schildkraut, JM 2016, 'Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women', British Journal of Cancer, vol. 114, no. 7, pp. 819-825. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2016.39
Peres LC, Camacho F, Abbott SE, Alberg AJ, Bandera EV, Barnholtz-Sloan J et al. Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. British Journal of Cancer. 2016 Mar 1;114(7):819-825. https://doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2016.39
Peres, Lauren C. ; Camacho, Fabian ; Abbott, Sarah E. ; Alberg, Anthony J. ; Bandera, Elisa V. ; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill ; Bondy, Melissa ; Cote, Michele L. ; Crankshaw, Sydnee ; Funkhouser, Ellen ; Moorman, Patricia G. ; Peters, Edward S. ; Schwartz, Ann G. ; Terry, Paul ; Wang, Frances ; Schildkraut, Joellen M. / Analgesic medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in African American women. In: British Journal of Cancer. 2016 ; Vol. 114, No. 7. pp. 819-825.
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abstract = "Background:Existing literature examining analgesic medication use and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk has been inconsistent, with the majority of studies reporting an inverse association. Race-specific effects of this relationship have not been adequately addressed.Methods:Utilising data from the largest population-based case-control study of EOC in African Americans, the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study, the relationship between analgesic use (aspirin, non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and acetaminophen) and risk of EOC was estimated by multivariate logistic regression. The association of frequency, duration, and indication of analgesic use on EOC risk was also assessed.Results:Aspirin use, overall, was associated with a 44{\%} lower EOC risk (OR=0.56; 95{\%} CI=0.35-0.92) and a 26{\%} lower EOC risk was observed for non-aspirin NSAID use (OR=0.74; 95{\%} CI=0.52-1.05). The inverse association was strongest for women taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease and women taking non-aspirin NSAIDs for arthritis. Significantly decreased EOC risks were observed for low-dose aspirin use, daily aspirin use, aspirin use for <5 years, and occasional non-aspirin NSAID use for a duration of ≥5 years. No association was observed for acetaminophen use.Conclusions:Collectively, these findings support previous evidence that any NSAID use is inversely associated with EOC risk.",
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