Ancestry Dependent DNA Methylation and Influence of Maternal Nutrition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is extensive variation in DNA methylation between individuals and ethnic groups. These differences arise from a combination of genetic and non-genetic influences and potential modifiers include nutritional cues, early life experience, and social and physical environments. Here we compare genome-wide DNA methylation in neonatal cord blood from African American (AA; N = 112) and European American (EA; N = 91) participants of the CANDLE Study (Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood). Our goal is to determine if there are replicable ancestry-specific methylation patterns that may implicate risk factors for diseases that have differential prevalence between populations. To identify the most robust ancestry-specific CpG sites, we replicate our results in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Yoruba African and CEPH European panels of Hap- Map. We also evaluate the influence of maternal nutrition-specifically, plasma levels of vitamin D and folate during pregnancy-on methylation in newborns. We define stable ancestry-dependent methylation of genes that include tumor suppressors and cell cycle regulators (e.g., APC, BRCA1, MCC). Overall, there is lower global methylation in African ancestral groups. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also considerably lower among AA mothers and about 60% of AA and 40% of EA mothers have concentrations below 20 ng/ml. Using a weighted correlation analysis, we define a network of CpG sites that is jointly modulated by ancestry and maternal vitamin D. Our results show that differences in DNA methylation patterns are remarkably stable and maternal micronutrients can exert an influence on the child epigenome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0118466
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 5 2015

Fingerprint

maternal nutrition
Methylation
DNA methylation
DNA Methylation
Nutrition
methylation
ancestry
vitamin D
Mothers
Vitamin D
Genes
Cells
Plasmas
life events
tumor suppressor genes
modifiers (genes)
Micronutrients
African Americans
nationalities and ethnic groups
Folic Acid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ancestry Dependent DNA Methylation and Influence of Maternal Nutrition. / Mozhui, Khyobeni; Smith, Alicia K.; Tylavsky, Frances.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 3, e0118466, 05.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{05a71fce864e41c989d4ee97083195fb,
title = "Ancestry Dependent DNA Methylation and Influence of Maternal Nutrition",
abstract = "There is extensive variation in DNA methylation between individuals and ethnic groups. These differences arise from a combination of genetic and non-genetic influences and potential modifiers include nutritional cues, early life experience, and social and physical environments. Here we compare genome-wide DNA methylation in neonatal cord blood from African American (AA; N = 112) and European American (EA; N = 91) participants of the CANDLE Study (Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood). Our goal is to determine if there are replicable ancestry-specific methylation patterns that may implicate risk factors for diseases that have differential prevalence between populations. To identify the most robust ancestry-specific CpG sites, we replicate our results in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Yoruba African and CEPH European panels of Hap- Map. We also evaluate the influence of maternal nutrition-specifically, plasma levels of vitamin D and folate during pregnancy-on methylation in newborns. We define stable ancestry-dependent methylation of genes that include tumor suppressors and cell cycle regulators (e.g., APC, BRCA1, MCC). Overall, there is lower global methylation in African ancestral groups. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also considerably lower among AA mothers and about 60{\%} of AA and 40{\%} of EA mothers have concentrations below 20 ng/ml. Using a weighted correlation analysis, we define a network of CpG sites that is jointly modulated by ancestry and maternal vitamin D. Our results show that differences in DNA methylation patterns are remarkably stable and maternal micronutrients can exert an influence on the child epigenome.",
author = "Khyobeni Mozhui and Smith, {Alicia K.} and Frances Tylavsky",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0118466",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ancestry Dependent DNA Methylation and Influence of Maternal Nutrition

AU - Mozhui, Khyobeni

AU - Smith, Alicia K.

AU - Tylavsky, Frances

PY - 2015/3/5

Y1 - 2015/3/5

N2 - There is extensive variation in DNA methylation between individuals and ethnic groups. These differences arise from a combination of genetic and non-genetic influences and potential modifiers include nutritional cues, early life experience, and social and physical environments. Here we compare genome-wide DNA methylation in neonatal cord blood from African American (AA; N = 112) and European American (EA; N = 91) participants of the CANDLE Study (Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood). Our goal is to determine if there are replicable ancestry-specific methylation patterns that may implicate risk factors for diseases that have differential prevalence between populations. To identify the most robust ancestry-specific CpG sites, we replicate our results in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Yoruba African and CEPH European panels of Hap- Map. We also evaluate the influence of maternal nutrition-specifically, plasma levels of vitamin D and folate during pregnancy-on methylation in newborns. We define stable ancestry-dependent methylation of genes that include tumor suppressors and cell cycle regulators (e.g., APC, BRCA1, MCC). Overall, there is lower global methylation in African ancestral groups. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also considerably lower among AA mothers and about 60% of AA and 40% of EA mothers have concentrations below 20 ng/ml. Using a weighted correlation analysis, we define a network of CpG sites that is jointly modulated by ancestry and maternal vitamin D. Our results show that differences in DNA methylation patterns are remarkably stable and maternal micronutrients can exert an influence on the child epigenome.

AB - There is extensive variation in DNA methylation between individuals and ethnic groups. These differences arise from a combination of genetic and non-genetic influences and potential modifiers include nutritional cues, early life experience, and social and physical environments. Here we compare genome-wide DNA methylation in neonatal cord blood from African American (AA; N = 112) and European American (EA; N = 91) participants of the CANDLE Study (Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood). Our goal is to determine if there are replicable ancestry-specific methylation patterns that may implicate risk factors for diseases that have differential prevalence between populations. To identify the most robust ancestry-specific CpG sites, we replicate our results in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Yoruba African and CEPH European panels of Hap- Map. We also evaluate the influence of maternal nutrition-specifically, plasma levels of vitamin D and folate during pregnancy-on methylation in newborns. We define stable ancestry-dependent methylation of genes that include tumor suppressors and cell cycle regulators (e.g., APC, BRCA1, MCC). Overall, there is lower global methylation in African ancestral groups. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D are also considerably lower among AA mothers and about 60% of AA and 40% of EA mothers have concentrations below 20 ng/ml. Using a weighted correlation analysis, we define a network of CpG sites that is jointly modulated by ancestry and maternal vitamin D. Our results show that differences in DNA methylation patterns are remarkably stable and maternal micronutrients can exert an influence on the child epigenome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924310221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924310221&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0118466

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0118466

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 3

M1 - e0118466

ER -