Angiotensin and the remodelling of the myocardium.

Karl Weber, JS Janicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. From a morphologic standpoint, the myocardium has three compartments: cardiac myocytes; intramyocardial coronary arteries with a microcirculation; and an interstitium composed largely of fibrillar collagen. As long as intercompartmental equilibrium exists, myocardial mechanics and energetics and myocyte viability will each be preserved. 2. The hypertrophic process seen with left ventricular pressure overload secondary to renovascular hypertension alters this equilibrium because of the adverse remodelling of intramural coronary arteries and fibrillar collagen. The pathogenetic mechanism(s) responsible for the observed myocardial fibrosis, having reactive and reparative components, remains to be elucidated. 3. Attractive circumstantial evidence, however, has been obtained to incriminate circulating angiotensin II in this process. Five lines of evidence favouring the role of angiotensin II in promoting the reactive perivascular and interstitial fibrosis and the reparative fibrosis are presented, including the potential cardioprotective effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141S-150S
JournalBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume28
Issue number2 S
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Angiotensins
Fibrillar Collagens
Myocardium
Fibrosis
Angiotensin II
Coronary Vessels
Renovascular Hypertension
Ventricular Pressure
Microcirculation
Mechanics
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Cardiac Myocytes
Muscle Cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Angiotensin and the remodelling of the myocardium. / Weber, Karl; Janicki, JS.

In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 28, No. 2 S, 01.01.1989, p. 141S-150S.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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