Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: Aesults from the Action for Health in Diabetes movement and memory study

Mark A. Espeland, Kristen M. Beavers, Bethany Barone Gibbs, Karen Johnson, Timothy M. Hughes, Laura D. Baker, John Jakicic, Mary Korytkowski, Marsha Miller, George A. Bray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and interartery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods The ABI and maximum interartery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered 4 to 5 years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p = 0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p ≤ 0.05), processing speed (both p ≤ 0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p < 0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger interartery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4-5 years later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1007
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Ankle Brachial Index
Cognition
Arteries
Blood Pressure
Health
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Social Adjustment
Vascular Diseases
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes : Aesults from the Action for Health in Diabetes movement and memory study. / Espeland, Mark A.; Beavers, Kristen M.; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen; Hughes, Timothy M.; Baker, Laura D.; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A.

In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.10.2015, p. 999-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Espeland, Mark A. ; Beavers, Kristen M. ; Gibbs, Bethany Barone ; Johnson, Karen ; Hughes, Timothy M. ; Baker, Laura D. ; Jakicic, John ; Korytkowski, Mary ; Miller, Marsha ; Bray, George A. / Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes : Aesults from the Action for Health in Diabetes movement and memory study. In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 999-1007.
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abstract = "Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and interartery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods The ABI and maximum interartery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered 4 to 5 years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p = 0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p ≤ 0.05), processing speed (both p ≤ 0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p < 0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger interartery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4-5 years later.",
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AU - Beavers, Kristen M.

AU - Gibbs, Bethany Barone

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AU - Hughes, Timothy M.

AU - Baker, Laura D.

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AB - Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and interartery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods The ABI and maximum interartery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered 4 to 5 years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p = 0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p ≤ 0.05), processing speed (both p ≤ 0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p < 0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger interartery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4-5 years later.

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