Answers to applicant selection from a directory of residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology

William Metheny, Frank W. Ling, Gerald B. Holzman, Martha J. Mitchum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To answer six questions applicants commonly ask of programs, using the data base of a directory of residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: We analyzed data from a directory of 258 civilian residency programs in the United States compiled from a 1994-1995 survey. We expanded the analysis to compare small and large residency programs on the six questions. Results: The average-size program of four residents per year received 50 applications for each position, offered interviews to less than a third of its applicants, and interviewed 15 applicants for each position. An interview gives an applicant a 7% chance of matching with a program. Small programs (fewer than four residents per year) interviewed more of their applicants than did large programs. Programs reported that their residents' scores on part I ranged from the 25th to the 90th percentile, and on part II from the 38th to the 92nd percentile. In general, residents in large programs scored better on these tests than did residents in small programs. Most programs (74%) considered electives beneficial in obtaining a residency position and reported a higher percentage of elective takers than programs without this policy. One in four residents in a program either took a senior elective there, graduated from the same institution, or both. Residents from programs offering fellowship training were twice as likely to pursue fellowship training than residents from programs with no fellowships. Large programs were four times more likely to sponsor fellowships than were small programs. Conclusion: Getting an interview in a residency program is a major accomplishment, whereas becoming known in a program may improve the applicant's odds of matching there. Applicants should review a program's policy on electives and selection record. Those considering fellowships should probably apply to programs that offer them. The directory offers a valuable data source for comparing residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-136
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Directories
Internship and Residency
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Interviews
Information Storage and Retrieval
Databases
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Answers to applicant selection from a directory of residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology. / Metheny, William; Ling, Frank W.; Holzman, Gerald B.; Mitchum, Martha J.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 88, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 133-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metheny, William ; Ling, Frank W. ; Holzman, Gerald B. ; Mitchum, Martha J. / Answers to applicant selection from a directory of residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 1996 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 133-136.
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abstract = "Objective: To answer six questions applicants commonly ask of programs, using the data base of a directory of residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: We analyzed data from a directory of 258 civilian residency programs in the United States compiled from a 1994-1995 survey. We expanded the analysis to compare small and large residency programs on the six questions. Results: The average-size program of four residents per year received 50 applications for each position, offered interviews to less than a third of its applicants, and interviewed 15 applicants for each position. An interview gives an applicant a 7{\%} chance of matching with a program. Small programs (fewer than four residents per year) interviewed more of their applicants than did large programs. Programs reported that their residents' scores on part I ranged from the 25th to the 90th percentile, and on part II from the 38th to the 92nd percentile. In general, residents in large programs scored better on these tests than did residents in small programs. Most programs (74{\%}) considered electives beneficial in obtaining a residency position and reported a higher percentage of elective takers than programs without this policy. One in four residents in a program either took a senior elective there, graduated from the same institution, or both. Residents from programs offering fellowship training were twice as likely to pursue fellowship training than residents from programs with no fellowships. Large programs were four times more likely to sponsor fellowships than were small programs. Conclusion: Getting an interview in a residency program is a major accomplishment, whereas becoming known in a program may improve the applicant's odds of matching there. Applicants should review a program's policy on electives and selection record. Those considering fellowships should probably apply to programs that offer them. The directory offers a valuable data source for comparing residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology.",
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