Anthropometrics at birth and risk of a primary central nervous system tumour

A systematic review and meta-analysis

NARECHEM-BT Working Group

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The aetiology of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours remains largely unknown, but their childhood peak points to perinatal parameters as tentative risk factors. In this meta-analysis, we opted to quantitatively synthesise published evidence on the association between birth anthropometrics and risk of primary CNS tumour. Methods Eligible studies were identified via systematic literature review; random-effects meta-analyses were conducted for the effect of birth weight and size-for-gestational-age on childhood and adult primary CNS tumours; subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression and dose–response by birth weight category analyses were also performed. Results Forty-one articles, encompassing 53,167 CNS tumour cases, were eligible. Birth weight >4000 g was associated with increased risk of childhood CNS tumour (OR: 1.14, [1.08–1.20]; 22,330 cases). The risk was higher for astrocytoma (OR: 1.22, [1.13–1.31]; 7456 cases) and embryonal tumour (OR: 1.16, [1.04–1.29]; 3574 cases) and non-significant for ependymoma (OR: 1.12, [0.94–1.34]; 1374 cases). Increased odds for a CNS tumour were also noted among large-for-gestational-age children (OR: 1.12, [1.03–1.22]; 10,339 cases), whereas insufficient data for synthesis were identified for other birth anthropometrics. The findings remained robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses controlling for several sources of bias, whereas no significant heterogeneity or publication bias were documented. The limited available evidence on adults (4 studies) did not reveal significant associations between increasing birth weight (500-g increment) and overall risk CNS tumour (OR: 0.99, [0.98–1.00]; 1091 cases) or glioma (OR: 1.03, [0.98–1.07]; 2052 cases). Conclusions This meta-analysis confirms a sizeable association of high birth weight, with childhood CNS tumour risk, particularly astrocytoma and embryonal tumour, which seems to be independent of gestational age. Further research is needed to explore underlying mechanisms, especially modifiable determinants of infant macrosomia, such as gestational diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-131
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume75
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Central Nervous System Neoplasms
Meta-Analysis
Parturition
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Astrocytoma
Ependymoma
Publication Bias
Gestational Diabetes
Glioma
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Anthropometrics at birth and risk of a primary central nervous system tumour : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / NARECHEM-BT Working Group.

In: European Journal of Cancer, Vol. 75, 01.04.2017, p. 117-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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title = "Anthropometrics at birth and risk of a primary central nervous system tumour: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background The aetiology of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours remains largely unknown, but their childhood peak points to perinatal parameters as tentative risk factors. In this meta-analysis, we opted to quantitatively synthesise published evidence on the association between birth anthropometrics and risk of primary CNS tumour. Methods Eligible studies were identified via systematic literature review; random-effects meta-analyses were conducted for the effect of birth weight and size-for-gestational-age on childhood and adult primary CNS tumours; subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression and dose–response by birth weight category analyses were also performed. Results Forty-one articles, encompassing 53,167 CNS tumour cases, were eligible. Birth weight >4000 g was associated with increased risk of childhood CNS tumour (OR: 1.14, [1.08–1.20]; 22,330 cases). The risk was higher for astrocytoma (OR: 1.22, [1.13–1.31]; 7456 cases) and embryonal tumour (OR: 1.16, [1.04–1.29]; 3574 cases) and non-significant for ependymoma (OR: 1.12, [0.94–1.34]; 1374 cases). Increased odds for a CNS tumour were also noted among large-for-gestational-age children (OR: 1.12, [1.03–1.22]; 10,339 cases), whereas insufficient data for synthesis were identified for other birth anthropometrics. The findings remained robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses controlling for several sources of bias, whereas no significant heterogeneity or publication bias were documented. The limited available evidence on adults (4 studies) did not reveal significant associations between increasing birth weight (500-g increment) and overall risk CNS tumour (OR: 0.99, [0.98–1.00]; 1091 cases) or glioma (OR: 1.03, [0.98–1.07]; 2052 cases). Conclusions This meta-analysis confirms a sizeable association of high birth weight, with childhood CNS tumour risk, particularly astrocytoma and embryonal tumour, which seems to be independent of gestational age. Further research is needed to explore underlying mechanisms, especially modifiable determinants of infant macrosomia, such as gestational diabetes.",
author = "{NARECHEM-BT Working Group} and Georgakis, {Marios K.} and Kalogirou, {Eleni I.} and Athanasios Liaskas and Karalexi, {Maria A.} and Paraskevi Papathoma and Kyriaki Ladopoulou and Maria Kantzanou and Georgios Tsivgoulis and Georgios Tsivgoulis and Apostolos Pourtsidis and Sophia Polychronopoulou and Emmanuel Hatzipantelis and Evgenia Papakonstantinou and Helen Dana and Eftichia Stiakaki and Evdoxia Bouka and Kalliopi Stefanaki and Spyros Sgouros and Eustratios Patsouris and Savvas Papadopoulos and Katerina Strantzia and Basilios Zountsas and Antonios Vakis and Nikolaos Kelekis and Georgios Sfakianos and Achilles Chatziioannou and Vasiliki Sidi and Michael Koutzoglou and Filippia Nikolaou and Stergios Zacharoulis and Petridou, {Eleni Th}",
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T1 - Anthropometrics at birth and risk of a primary central nervous system tumour

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - NARECHEM-BT Working Group

AU - Georgakis, Marios K.

AU - Kalogirou, Eleni I.

AU - Liaskas, Athanasios

AU - Karalexi, Maria A.

AU - Papathoma, Paraskevi

AU - Ladopoulou, Kyriaki

AU - Kantzanou, Maria

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Tsivgoulis, Georgios

AU - Pourtsidis, Apostolos

AU - Polychronopoulou, Sophia

AU - Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel

AU - Papakonstantinou, Evgenia

AU - Dana, Helen

AU - Stiakaki, Eftichia

AU - Bouka, Evdoxia

AU - Stefanaki, Kalliopi

AU - Sgouros, Spyros

AU - Patsouris, Eustratios

AU - Papadopoulos, Savvas

AU - Strantzia, Katerina

AU - Zountsas, Basilios

AU - Vakis, Antonios

AU - Kelekis, Nikolaos

AU - Sfakianos, Georgios

AU - Chatziioannou, Achilles

AU - Sidi, Vasiliki

AU - Koutzoglou, Michael

AU - Nikolaou, Filippia

AU - Zacharoulis, Stergios

AU - Petridou, Eleni Th

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Background The aetiology of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours remains largely unknown, but their childhood peak points to perinatal parameters as tentative risk factors. In this meta-analysis, we opted to quantitatively synthesise published evidence on the association between birth anthropometrics and risk of primary CNS tumour. Methods Eligible studies were identified via systematic literature review; random-effects meta-analyses were conducted for the effect of birth weight and size-for-gestational-age on childhood and adult primary CNS tumours; subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression and dose–response by birth weight category analyses were also performed. Results Forty-one articles, encompassing 53,167 CNS tumour cases, were eligible. Birth weight >4000 g was associated with increased risk of childhood CNS tumour (OR: 1.14, [1.08–1.20]; 22,330 cases). The risk was higher for astrocytoma (OR: 1.22, [1.13–1.31]; 7456 cases) and embryonal tumour (OR: 1.16, [1.04–1.29]; 3574 cases) and non-significant for ependymoma (OR: 1.12, [0.94–1.34]; 1374 cases). Increased odds for a CNS tumour were also noted among large-for-gestational-age children (OR: 1.12, [1.03–1.22]; 10,339 cases), whereas insufficient data for synthesis were identified for other birth anthropometrics. The findings remained robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses controlling for several sources of bias, whereas no significant heterogeneity or publication bias were documented. The limited available evidence on adults (4 studies) did not reveal significant associations between increasing birth weight (500-g increment) and overall risk CNS tumour (OR: 0.99, [0.98–1.00]; 1091 cases) or glioma (OR: 1.03, [0.98–1.07]; 2052 cases). Conclusions This meta-analysis confirms a sizeable association of high birth weight, with childhood CNS tumour risk, particularly astrocytoma and embryonal tumour, which seems to be independent of gestational age. Further research is needed to explore underlying mechanisms, especially modifiable determinants of infant macrosomia, such as gestational diabetes.

AB - Background The aetiology of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours remains largely unknown, but their childhood peak points to perinatal parameters as tentative risk factors. In this meta-analysis, we opted to quantitatively synthesise published evidence on the association between birth anthropometrics and risk of primary CNS tumour. Methods Eligible studies were identified via systematic literature review; random-effects meta-analyses were conducted for the effect of birth weight and size-for-gestational-age on childhood and adult primary CNS tumours; subgroup, sensitivity, meta-regression and dose–response by birth weight category analyses were also performed. Results Forty-one articles, encompassing 53,167 CNS tumour cases, were eligible. Birth weight >4000 g was associated with increased risk of childhood CNS tumour (OR: 1.14, [1.08–1.20]; 22,330 cases). The risk was higher for astrocytoma (OR: 1.22, [1.13–1.31]; 7456 cases) and embryonal tumour (OR: 1.16, [1.04–1.29]; 3574 cases) and non-significant for ependymoma (OR: 1.12, [0.94–1.34]; 1374 cases). Increased odds for a CNS tumour were also noted among large-for-gestational-age children (OR: 1.12, [1.03–1.22]; 10,339 cases), whereas insufficient data for synthesis were identified for other birth anthropometrics. The findings remained robust across subgroup and sensitivity analyses controlling for several sources of bias, whereas no significant heterogeneity or publication bias were documented. The limited available evidence on adults (4 studies) did not reveal significant associations between increasing birth weight (500-g increment) and overall risk CNS tumour (OR: 0.99, [0.98–1.00]; 1091 cases) or glioma (OR: 1.03, [0.98–1.07]; 2052 cases). Conclusions This meta-analysis confirms a sizeable association of high birth weight, with childhood CNS tumour risk, particularly astrocytoma and embryonal tumour, which seems to be independent of gestational age. Further research is needed to explore underlying mechanisms, especially modifiable determinants of infant macrosomia, such as gestational diabetes.

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