Antibiotic-Coated ePTFE Decreases Graft Colonization and Neointimal Hyperplasia1

Peter Fischer, Thomas J. Schroeppel, Timothy Fabian, Waldemar G. deRijk, Norma M. Edwards, Louis J. Magnotti, Daniel H. Doty, Martin Croce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Synthetic vascular conduits used in traumatic or infected fields have a high failure rate leading to catastrophic consequences including amputation and death. Although efforts to coat vascular grafts with antibiotics have had varying results, we developed a novel coating technique for expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), which has proven to be effective in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that the coated grafts would resist infection and have decreased neointimal hyperplasia when used in vivo in a large animal model. Methods: Minocycline and rifampin suspended in a mixture of methacrylates were coated onto a 3 cm segment of 6 mm ePTFE (Bard, Tempe, AZ). An antibiotic-coated (ABX), adhesive-coated (AC), or control (C) ePTFE graft was then placed as an end-to-side graft into the left iliac artery of a male mongrel pig. Sterile saline or innoculum containing 3 × 108 Staphylococcus aureus (SA) or Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) was then placed directly on the graft and the reflected peritoneum re-approximated to confine the bacteria. After 6 wk, the graft was harvested, cultured, and morphometric analyses of neointimal hyperplasia were performed. Results: Twenty-seven pigs had grafts placed (9 ABX, 9 AC, 9 C) and harvested. Of the nine grafts exposed to SA, the uncoated and adhesive-coated grafts averaged greater than 50,000 colonies of SA while the antibiotic-coated grafts averaged less than 50 colonies. Although not statistically significant, neointimal hyperplasia was decreased by 15% to 20% when using an ABX graft in an infected field. Conclusions: The coated grafts appeared to decrease NIH formation although not significantly in this small pilot study. The methacrylate antibiotic-coated ePTFE graft did provide resistance to infection when used in infected fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume156
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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Polytetrafluoroethylene
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Transplants
Adhesives
Hyperplasia
Staphylococcus aureus
Methacrylates
Blood Vessels
Swine
Minocycline
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Iliac Artery
Peritoneum
Rifampin
Amputation
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Antibiotic-Coated ePTFE Decreases Graft Colonization and Neointimal Hyperplasia1 . / Fischer, Peter; Schroeppel, Thomas J.; Fabian, Timothy; deRijk, Waldemar G.; Edwards, Norma M.; Magnotti, Louis J.; Doty, Daniel H.; Croce, Martin.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 156, No. 2, 01.10.2009, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fischer, P, Schroeppel, TJ, Fabian, T, deRijk, WG, Edwards, NM, Magnotti, LJ, Doty, DH & Croce, M 2009, 'Antibiotic-Coated ePTFE Decreases Graft Colonization and Neointimal Hyperplasia1 ', Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 156, no. 2, pp. 199-204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2009.01.016
Fischer, Peter ; Schroeppel, Thomas J. ; Fabian, Timothy ; deRijk, Waldemar G. ; Edwards, Norma M. ; Magnotti, Louis J. ; Doty, Daniel H. ; Croce, Martin. / Antibiotic-Coated ePTFE Decreases Graft Colonization and Neointimal Hyperplasia1 . In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2009 ; Vol. 156, No. 2. pp. 199-204.
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AU - Edwards, Norma M.

AU - Magnotti, Louis J.

AU - Doty, Daniel H.

AU - Croce, Martin

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