Antibiotic resistance among bacterial conjunctival pathogens collected in the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study

Penny Asbell, Heleen H. DeCory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study evaluates in vitro antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Haemophilus influenzae isolates from ocular infections. Here we report resistance rates and trends among conjunctival-sourced ocular isolates collected across the US from 2009 through 2016. A total of 1198 conjunctival isolates (483 S. aureus, 305 CoNS, 208 H. influenzae, 118 S. pneumoniae, and 84 P. aeruginosa) were collected from patients with presumed bacterial conjunctivitis from 57 sites across 40 states. A large proportion of staphylococci demonstrated resistance to oxacillin and azithromycin, while resistance was low against the majority of antibiotics tested for S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and H. influenzae. Multidrug resistance (3 antibiotic classes) was found in 30.2% of S. aureus and 39.0% of CoNS isolates, and methicillin resistance more than doubled the rate of multi-drug resistance (methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], 76.5%; methicillin-resistant CoNS isolates, 72.8%). There was a pattern of increasing mean percent resistance with increasing age by decade of life among S. aureus, MRSA, and CoNS (P0.038). Over the eight-year study period, there were small yet significant decreases in resistance rates among S. aureus to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, trimethoprim, and oxacillin (P0.003), and among CoNS and P. aeruginosa (both P<0.05) to ciprofloxacin. These data indicate that antibiotic resistance is high, but did not increase, among conjunctival-sourced isolates collected in the US from 2009 through 2016. For certain antibiotic/pathogen combinations, there was a trend of decreased resistance, including a decrease in oxacillin resistance among S. aureus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0205814
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Bacterial Drug Resistance
coagulase negative staphylococci
Coagulase
Pathogens
Microbial Drug Resistance
Staphylococcus
antibiotic resistance
Microorganisms
Staphylococcus aureus
Methicillin
eyes
Anti-Bacterial Agents
microorganisms
oxacillin
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Oxacillin
Haemophilus influenzae
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Monitoring
pathogens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{e6564e6fdfbd4152b5e4e62efb69eaff,
title = "Antibiotic resistance among bacterial conjunctival pathogens collected in the Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study",
abstract = "The Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring in Ocular Microorganisms (ARMOR) surveillance study evaluates in vitro antibiotic resistance among Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Haemophilus influenzae isolates from ocular infections. Here we report resistance rates and trends among conjunctival-sourced ocular isolates collected across the US from 2009 through 2016. A total of 1198 conjunctival isolates (483 S. aureus, 305 CoNS, 208 H. influenzae, 118 S. pneumoniae, and 84 P. aeruginosa) were collected from patients with presumed bacterial conjunctivitis from 57 sites across 40 states. A large proportion of staphylococci demonstrated resistance to oxacillin and azithromycin, while resistance was low against the majority of antibiotics tested for S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and H. influenzae. Multidrug resistance (3 antibiotic classes) was found in 30.2{\%} of S. aureus and 39.0{\%} of CoNS isolates, and methicillin resistance more than doubled the rate of multi-drug resistance (methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], 76.5{\%}; methicillin-resistant CoNS isolates, 72.8{\%}). There was a pattern of increasing mean percent resistance with increasing age by decade of life among S. aureus, MRSA, and CoNS (P0.038). Over the eight-year study period, there were small yet significant decreases in resistance rates among S. aureus to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, trimethoprim, and oxacillin (P0.003), and among CoNS and P. aeruginosa (both P<0.05) to ciprofloxacin. These data indicate that antibiotic resistance is high, but did not increase, among conjunctival-sourced isolates collected in the US from 2009 through 2016. For certain antibiotic/pathogen combinations, there was a trend of decreased resistance, including a decrease in oxacillin resistance among S. aureus.",
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