Antibody to C1-inhibitor in a patient receiving C1-inhibitor infusions for treatment of hereditary angioneurotic edema with systemic lupus erythematosus reacts with a normal allotype of residue 458 of C1-inhibitor

V. H. Donaldson, John Bissler, T. R. Welch, M. F. Burton, A. E. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with hereditary C4 deficiency are likely to have severe lupus erythematosus. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had a chronic deficiency in C4 because the hereditary deficiency on C1-inhibitor allowed the C1 in her serum to become activated and then inactivate C4. An attempt was made to repair the C4 deficiency as well as the deficiency in C1-inhibitor by giving infusions of human C1-inhibitor in the hope of inducing remissions of both HANE and SLE. During treatment, antibody to C1-inhibitor developed in the patient; this cleared when the infusions were stopped. During subsequent treatment with danazol alone, measurable C1-inhibitor developed in the patient's serum, but levels of C4 were never significantly increased. Antibody to normal C1-inhibitor was not expected to develop in the patient because she is heterozygous for this autosomal dominant trait. A normal allotype (VAL or MET 458), which would have been in the preparation used but which the patient does not synthesize because she can produce only one allotype (MET 458), appears to have been immunogenic. The antibody isolated from the patient's serum reacted with C1-inhibitor from a normal individual known to be homozygous for 458-VAL but not with one from a homozygote for MET-458.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-443
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume128
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Hereditary Angioedemas
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Antibodies
Danazol
Repair
Therapeutics
Serum
Homozygote

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Antibody to C1-inhibitor in a patient receiving C1-inhibitor infusions for treatment of hereditary angioneurotic edema with systemic lupus erythematosus reacts with a normal allotype of residue 458 of C1-inhibitor",
abstract = "Patients with hereditary C4 deficiency are likely to have severe lupus erythematosus. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had a chronic deficiency in C4 because the hereditary deficiency on C1-inhibitor allowed the C1 in her serum to become activated and then inactivate C4. An attempt was made to repair the C4 deficiency as well as the deficiency in C1-inhibitor by giving infusions of human C1-inhibitor in the hope of inducing remissions of both HANE and SLE. During treatment, antibody to C1-inhibitor developed in the patient; this cleared when the infusions were stopped. During subsequent treatment with danazol alone, measurable C1-inhibitor developed in the patient's serum, but levels of C4 were never significantly increased. Antibody to normal C1-inhibitor was not expected to develop in the patient because she is heterozygous for this autosomal dominant trait. A normal allotype (VAL or MET 458), which would have been in the preparation used but which the patient does not synthesize because she can produce only one allotype (MET 458), appears to have been immunogenic. The antibody isolated from the patient's serum reacted with C1-inhibitor from a normal individual known to be homozygous for 458-VAL but not with one from a homozygote for MET-458.",
author = "Donaldson, {V. H.} and John Bissler and Welch, {T. R.} and Burton, {M. F.} and Davis, {A. E.}",
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T1 - Antibody to C1-inhibitor in a patient receiving C1-inhibitor infusions for treatment of hereditary angioneurotic edema with systemic lupus erythematosus reacts with a normal allotype of residue 458 of C1-inhibitor

AU - Donaldson, V. H.

AU - Bissler, John

AU - Welch, T. R.

AU - Burton, M. F.

AU - Davis, A. E.

PY - 1996/1/1

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N2 - Patients with hereditary C4 deficiency are likely to have severe lupus erythematosus. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had a chronic deficiency in C4 because the hereditary deficiency on C1-inhibitor allowed the C1 in her serum to become activated and then inactivate C4. An attempt was made to repair the C4 deficiency as well as the deficiency in C1-inhibitor by giving infusions of human C1-inhibitor in the hope of inducing remissions of both HANE and SLE. During treatment, antibody to C1-inhibitor developed in the patient; this cleared when the infusions were stopped. During subsequent treatment with danazol alone, measurable C1-inhibitor developed in the patient's serum, but levels of C4 were never significantly increased. Antibody to normal C1-inhibitor was not expected to develop in the patient because she is heterozygous for this autosomal dominant trait. A normal allotype (VAL or MET 458), which would have been in the preparation used but which the patient does not synthesize because she can produce only one allotype (MET 458), appears to have been immunogenic. The antibody isolated from the patient's serum reacted with C1-inhibitor from a normal individual known to be homozygous for 458-VAL but not with one from a homozygote for MET-458.

AB - Patients with hereditary C4 deficiency are likely to have severe lupus erythematosus. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema (HANE) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) had a chronic deficiency in C4 because the hereditary deficiency on C1-inhibitor allowed the C1 in her serum to become activated and then inactivate C4. An attempt was made to repair the C4 deficiency as well as the deficiency in C1-inhibitor by giving infusions of human C1-inhibitor in the hope of inducing remissions of both HANE and SLE. During treatment, antibody to C1-inhibitor developed in the patient; this cleared when the infusions were stopped. During subsequent treatment with danazol alone, measurable C1-inhibitor developed in the patient's serum, but levels of C4 were never significantly increased. Antibody to normal C1-inhibitor was not expected to develop in the patient because she is heterozygous for this autosomal dominant trait. A normal allotype (VAL or MET 458), which would have been in the preparation used but which the patient does not synthesize because she can produce only one allotype (MET 458), appears to have been immunogenic. The antibody isolated from the patient's serum reacted with C1-inhibitor from a normal individual known to be homozygous for 458-VAL but not with one from a homozygote for MET-458.

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