Anticoagulation clinic workflow analysis

Sara R. Vazquez, Jennifer Campbell, Gale Hamann, Christa George, Laura Sprabery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate a workflow model and define factors affecting patient visit length in an anticoagulation clinic primarily treating an urban patient population. Design: Workflow analysis. Setting: Anticoagulation clinic in Memphis, TN, between November 2005 and April 2006. Patients: 240 and 246 patient visits were assessed pre- and postintervention, respectively. Intervention: For 7 weeks, pharmacists documented factors affecting visit length and problems addressed during the visit, which were classified as anticoagulation or non-anticoagulation related. Following data analysis, changes were made to address inefficiencies in the clinic workflow. Postintervention data were collected for 7 weeks to assess the impact of these interventions. Main outcome measures: Patient visit length and factors affecting patient visit length. Results: Factors affecting visit length were overbooking, pharmacist preceptor availability, attending physician availability, and repeat venipuncture. To target these inefficiencies, changes were made to the clinic schedule and workflow and a patient-provider agreement was implemented. These interventions decreased the frequency of the visit length factors significantly. As a result, pharmacist providers addressed significantly more total problems (anticoagulation problems plus nonanticoagulation problems) without an increase in visit length. Conclusion: Periodically evaluating workflow efficiency and making changes, if indicated, is important. In this study, we identified areas for improvement in anticoagulation clinic efficiency and implemented specifically targeted interventions. The resolution of workflow issues created a more streamlined patient visit. This provided more time for pharmacists to address important health issues specific to our indigent patient population. Other clinicians can apply this model to their practice setting to evaluate and make improvements to workflow efficiency as a means of providing high-quality patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-85
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Workflow
Availability
Pharmacists
Health
Phlebotomy
Urban Population
Quality of Health Care
Poverty
Patient Care
Appointments and Schedules
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Anticoagulation clinic workflow analysis. / Vazquez, Sara R.; Campbell, Jennifer; Hamann, Gale; George, Christa; Sprabery, Laura.

In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 78-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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