Antiendothelial antibodies after heart transplantation

The accelerating factor in transplant-associated coronary artery disease?

S. J. Crisp, M. J. Dunn, M. L. Rose, M. Barbir, M. H. Yacoub, Paul Hauptman, R. E. Morris, W. Page Faulk, R. E. Hershberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the precise cause of transplant-associated coronary artery disease is unknown, immune mechanisms have been implicated. Using the techniques of SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting, we have previously shown that a strong positive correlation exists between the development of coronary artery disease and the presence of antiendothelial antibodies reactive with a doublet of polypeptides of approximately 60 and 62 kDa. We have now extended this study to investigate the temporal pattern of antiendothelial antibody formation after transplantation and its association with cellular rejection episodes. The original study used patients in whom coronary artery disease had developed early after transplantation, that is at 1 or 2 years. Here we investigate whether antiendothelial antibodies are also made in patients in whom the disease does not develop until 5 to 10 years after heart transplantation and whether the antibodies are found in patients with severe nontransplant atherosclerosis. We confirm the 60 to 62 kDa antigens are membrane bound, and recalculation of their molecular mass makes the doublet 56 and 57.5 kDa. The results show that antibodies specific for the doublet of endothelial antigens are rarely produced by patients other than those in whom rapidly progressing coronary artery disease develops early after transplantation. The antibodies are unrelated to cellular rejection episodes. We believe their production may be an accelerating factor for the rapid development of transplant-associated coronary artery disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-92
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume13
Issue number1 I
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Chaperonin 60
Isoantibodies
Antibody Specificity
Isoantigens
Vascular Endothelium
Graft Rejection
Heart Transplantation
Surface Antigens
Heat-Shock Proteins
Coronary Disease
Immunoglobulin M
Longitudinal Studies
Coronary Artery Disease
Cultured Cells
Membrane Proteins
Immunoglobulin G
Transplants
Antibodies
Transplantation
Antigens

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Antiendothelial antibodies after heart transplantation : The accelerating factor in transplant-associated coronary artery disease? / Crisp, S. J.; Dunn, M. J.; Rose, M. L.; Barbir, M.; Yacoub, M. H.; Hauptman, Paul; Morris, R. E.; Page Faulk, W.; Hershberger, R. E.

In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, Vol. 13, No. 1 I, 01.01.1994, p. 81-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crisp, SJ, Dunn, MJ, Rose, ML, Barbir, M, Yacoub, MH, Hauptman, P, Morris, RE, Page Faulk, W & Hershberger, RE 1994, 'Antiendothelial antibodies after heart transplantation: The accelerating factor in transplant-associated coronary artery disease?', Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, vol. 13, no. 1 I, pp. 81-92.
Crisp, S. J. ; Dunn, M. J. ; Rose, M. L. ; Barbir, M. ; Yacoub, M. H. ; Hauptman, Paul ; Morris, R. E. ; Page Faulk, W. ; Hershberger, R. E. / Antiendothelial antibodies after heart transplantation : The accelerating factor in transplant-associated coronary artery disease?. In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 1994 ; Vol. 13, No. 1 I. pp. 81-92.
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