Aortoiliac reconstruction following penetrating injury.

Martin Croce, R. M. Stewart, Timothy Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In summary, there are several factors essential to successful treatment of major vascular abdominal injuries. Prompt resuscitation and abdominal exploration is paramount. Proximal control can quickly be obtained at the esophageal hiatus and adequate exposure of the retroperitoneum is mandatory. Most aortic injuries can be repaired primarily; however, if an arterial substitute is necessary, then PTFE is the substitute of choice. Reimplantation of the injured iliac artery to the contralateral iliac artery is an option for bifurcation injuries if that will not inordinately constrict the lumen. And finally, four-compartment fasciotomies will decompress the lower extremities and prevent ischemic muscle necrosis following reperfusion injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-428
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the Tennessee Medical Association
Volume85
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Iliac Artery
Abdominal Injuries
Replantation
Vascular System Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Reperfusion Injury
Resuscitation
Lower Extremity
Necrosis
Muscles
Therapeutics
Fasciotomy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Aortoiliac reconstruction following penetrating injury. / Croce, Martin; Stewart, R. M.; Fabian, Timothy.

In: Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association, Vol. 85, No. 9, 01.01.1992, p. 427-428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Croce, Martin ; Stewart, R. M. ; Fabian, Timothy. / Aortoiliac reconstruction following penetrating injury. In: Journal of the Tennessee Medical Association. 1992 ; Vol. 85, No. 9. pp. 427-428.
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