Apical cyst theory: A missing link

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The mechanism of the formation of apical cyst has been elusive. Several theories have long been proposed and discussed speculating how an apical cyst is developed and formed in the jaw bone resulting from endododontic infection. Two popular theories are the nutritional deficiency theory and the abscess theory. The nutritional deficiency theory assumes that the over proliferated epithelial cells will form a ball mass such that the cells in the center of the mass will be deprived of nutrition. The abscess theory postulates that when an abscess cavity is formed in connective tissue, epithelial cells proliferate and line the preexisting cavity because of their inherent tendency to cover exposed connective tissue surfaces. Based on the nature of epithelial cells and the epithelium, nutritional theory is a fairy tale, while abscess theory at best just indicates that abscess may be one of the factors that allows the stratified epithelium to form but not to explain a mechanism that makes the cyst to form. The hypothesis: Apical cyst formation is the result of proliferation of resting epithelial cells, due to inflammation, to a sufficient number such that they are able to form a polarized and stratified epithelial lining against dead tissues or foreign materials. These stratified epithelial lining expands along the dead tissue or foreign materials and eventually wrap around them as a spherical sac, i.e. a cyst. The space in the sac is considered the external environment separating the internal (tissue) environment the natural function of epithelium. Evaluation of the hypothesis: This theory may be tested by introducing a biodegradable device able to slowly release epithelial cell mitogens in an in vivo environment implanted with epithelial cells next to a foreign object. This will allow the cells to continuously proliferate which may form a cystic sac wrapping around the foreign object.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-84
Number of pages9
JournalDental Hypotheses
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

Cysts
Abscess
Epithelial Cells
Epithelium
Foreign Bodies
Malnutrition
Connective Tissue Cells
Jaw
Connective Tissue
Inflammation
Bone and Bones
Cell Line
Equipment and Supplies
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Apical cyst theory : A missing link. / Huang, George.

In: Dental Hypotheses, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.10.2010, p. 76-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, George. / Apical cyst theory : A missing link. In: Dental Hypotheses. 2010 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 76-84.
@article{75c28c6e461641ff979da381734dfafe,
title = "Apical cyst theory: A missing link",
abstract = "Introduction: The mechanism of the formation of apical cyst has been elusive. Several theories have long been proposed and discussed speculating how an apical cyst is developed and formed in the jaw bone resulting from endododontic infection. Two popular theories are the nutritional deficiency theory and the abscess theory. The nutritional deficiency theory assumes that the over proliferated epithelial cells will form a ball mass such that the cells in the center of the mass will be deprived of nutrition. The abscess theory postulates that when an abscess cavity is formed in connective tissue, epithelial cells proliferate and line the preexisting cavity because of their inherent tendency to cover exposed connective tissue surfaces. Based on the nature of epithelial cells and the epithelium, nutritional theory is a fairy tale, while abscess theory at best just indicates that abscess may be one of the factors that allows the stratified epithelium to form but not to explain a mechanism that makes the cyst to form. The hypothesis: Apical cyst formation is the result of proliferation of resting epithelial cells, due to inflammation, to a sufficient number such that they are able to form a polarized and stratified epithelial lining against dead tissues or foreign materials. These stratified epithelial lining expands along the dead tissue or foreign materials and eventually wrap around them as a spherical sac, i.e. a cyst. The space in the sac is considered the external environment separating the internal (tissue) environment the natural function of epithelium. Evaluation of the hypothesis: This theory may be tested by introducing a biodegradable device able to slowly release epithelial cell mitogens in an in vivo environment implanted with epithelial cells next to a foreign object. This will allow the cells to continuously proliferate which may form a cystic sac wrapping around the foreign object.",
author = "George Huang",
year = "2010",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5436/j.dehy.2010.1.00013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1",
pages = "76--84",
journal = "Dental Hypotheses",
issn = "2155-8213",
publisher = "Medknow Publications and Media Pvt. Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Apical cyst theory

T2 - A missing link

AU - Huang, George

PY - 2010/10/1

Y1 - 2010/10/1

N2 - Introduction: The mechanism of the formation of apical cyst has been elusive. Several theories have long been proposed and discussed speculating how an apical cyst is developed and formed in the jaw bone resulting from endododontic infection. Two popular theories are the nutritional deficiency theory and the abscess theory. The nutritional deficiency theory assumes that the over proliferated epithelial cells will form a ball mass such that the cells in the center of the mass will be deprived of nutrition. The abscess theory postulates that when an abscess cavity is formed in connective tissue, epithelial cells proliferate and line the preexisting cavity because of their inherent tendency to cover exposed connective tissue surfaces. Based on the nature of epithelial cells and the epithelium, nutritional theory is a fairy tale, while abscess theory at best just indicates that abscess may be one of the factors that allows the stratified epithelium to form but not to explain a mechanism that makes the cyst to form. The hypothesis: Apical cyst formation is the result of proliferation of resting epithelial cells, due to inflammation, to a sufficient number such that they are able to form a polarized and stratified epithelial lining against dead tissues or foreign materials. These stratified epithelial lining expands along the dead tissue or foreign materials and eventually wrap around them as a spherical sac, i.e. a cyst. The space in the sac is considered the external environment separating the internal (tissue) environment the natural function of epithelium. Evaluation of the hypothesis: This theory may be tested by introducing a biodegradable device able to slowly release epithelial cell mitogens in an in vivo environment implanted with epithelial cells next to a foreign object. This will allow the cells to continuously proliferate which may form a cystic sac wrapping around the foreign object.

AB - Introduction: The mechanism of the formation of apical cyst has been elusive. Several theories have long been proposed and discussed speculating how an apical cyst is developed and formed in the jaw bone resulting from endododontic infection. Two popular theories are the nutritional deficiency theory and the abscess theory. The nutritional deficiency theory assumes that the over proliferated epithelial cells will form a ball mass such that the cells in the center of the mass will be deprived of nutrition. The abscess theory postulates that when an abscess cavity is formed in connective tissue, epithelial cells proliferate and line the preexisting cavity because of their inherent tendency to cover exposed connective tissue surfaces. Based on the nature of epithelial cells and the epithelium, nutritional theory is a fairy tale, while abscess theory at best just indicates that abscess may be one of the factors that allows the stratified epithelium to form but not to explain a mechanism that makes the cyst to form. The hypothesis: Apical cyst formation is the result of proliferation of resting epithelial cells, due to inflammation, to a sufficient number such that they are able to form a polarized and stratified epithelial lining against dead tissues or foreign materials. These stratified epithelial lining expands along the dead tissue or foreign materials and eventually wrap around them as a spherical sac, i.e. a cyst. The space in the sac is considered the external environment separating the internal (tissue) environment the natural function of epithelium. Evaluation of the hypothesis: This theory may be tested by introducing a biodegradable device able to slowly release epithelial cell mitogens in an in vivo environment implanted with epithelial cells next to a foreign object. This will allow the cells to continuously proliferate which may form a cystic sac wrapping around the foreign object.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865524293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865524293&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5436/j.dehy.2010.1.00013

DO - 10.5436/j.dehy.2010.1.00013

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84865524293

VL - 1

SP - 76

EP - 84

JO - Dental Hypotheses

JF - Dental Hypotheses

SN - 2155-8213

IS - 2

ER -