Apical root resorption in patients treated with comprehensive orthodontics.

Edward Harris, B. W. Boggan, D. A. Wheeler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

External apical root resorption (EARR) is a common--but seldom extreme--consequence of orthodontic treatment. Incisors are most at risk, perhaps because of their single roots and because they typically are moved farther than other teeth. We followed a cohort of patients (n = 153) treated with comprehensive orthodontics. EARR was scored on the upper incisors with a qualitative five-grade ordinal scale. There was no EARR at the start of treatment, but most (> 80%) exhibited slight-to-moderate EARR by the end of treatment (i.e., a loss of 1-2 mm). Cases treated with premolar extractions experienced more EARR because their incisors were retracted farther; however, the sum of the effects of patients' sex and age, and severity of the malocclusion, and the kind of mechanics used accounts for little of the overall variation in EARR. Instead, it appears that genetically-based inter-individual variation in susceptibility to EARR is the most influential factor. Research should be directed at understanding the biochemical nature of susceptibility so prospective patients can be screened to identify those at particular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-33
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of the Tennessee Dental Association
Volume81
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Root Resorption
Orthodontics
Incisor
Malocclusion
Bicuspid
Mechanics
Tooth
Therapeutics
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Apical root resorption in patients treated with comprehensive orthodontics. / Harris, Edward; Boggan, B. W.; Wheeler, D. A.

In: The Journal of the Tennessee Dental Association, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 30-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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