Apolipoprotein secretion and lipid synthesis

Regulation by fatty acids in newborn swine intestinal epithelial cells

Heng Wang, Helen M. Berschneider, Jianhui Du, Dennis Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The IPEC-1 newborn swine intestinal epithelial cell line was used to determine the effects of the uptake of various fatty acids on the secretion of apolipoprotein (apo) B and apo A-I, as well as triglyceride and phospholipid. Long-chain saturated fatty acids were taken up and stimulated triglyceride synthesis, and palmitic (16:0) and stearic (18:0) acids also stimulated phospholipid synthesis. However, these fatty acids did not enhance triglyceride, phospholipid, or apo B or apo A-I secretion. Oleic acid (18:1) was the most effective of all fatty acids tested in stimulating triglyceride synthesis and the secretion of triglyceride, phospholipid, and apo B. Linoleic (18:2) and linolenic (18:3) acids were no more effective than long- chain saturated fatty acids in stimulating these processes. With saturated fatty acids, apo A-I followed the same secretory pattern as apo B. However, among the unsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid was the least effective and linolenic acid was the most effective in stimulating apo A-I secretion. Basolateral secretion of lipid and apolipoproteins by differentiated IPEC-1 cells is differentially regulated by apical exposure to fatty acids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume272
Issue number5 35-5
StatePublished - May 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Apolipoproteins
Swine
Fatty Acids
Epithelial Cells
Lipids
Apolipoprotein A-I
Apolipoproteins B
Triglycerides
Phospholipids
Oleic Acid
Acids
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Apolipoprotein secretion and lipid synthesis : Regulation by fatty acids in newborn swine intestinal epithelial cells. / Wang, Heng; Berschneider, Helen M.; Du, Jianhui; Black, Dennis.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, Vol. 272, No. 5 35-5, 01.05.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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