Apparent shift in visual field preference after unilateral stroke

Walter H. Riege, E. Metter, Wayne R. Hanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patients with either a left- or a right-hemisphere stroke lesion scored higher in tasks of word-picture matching and of nonverbal shape matching when information was presented tachistoscopically (120 msec) to the visual field (VF) projecting to their undamaged hemisphere. Left-hemisphere stroke patients (n = 13) were dissociated from right-hemisphere stroke patients (n = 15) by low word recognition from memory and by low right VF but nearly normal left VF accuracy in word-picture matching or shape matching; the former appeared to rely upon processing of word meaning by the right hemisphere. In contrast, right-stroke patients had higher right than left VF scores in both tasks, and their discrimination of nonverbal shapes via the right VF was not different from that of controls (n = 15). Preferred processing by the the VF projecting to the undamaged hemisphere appeared as a shift in perceptual asymmetry but may indicate, in support of a "direct access" model, that each hemisphere responds more or less efficiently to word and to nonverbal shape discriminations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-373
Number of pages13
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Visual Fields
Stroke
Word Processing
Patient Rights
Visual Field
Hemisphere
Right Hemisphere

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Apparent shift in visual field preference after unilateral stroke. / Riege, Walter H.; Metter, E.; Hanson, Wayne R.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.01.1988, p. 361-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riege, Walter H. ; Metter, E. ; Hanson, Wayne R. / Apparent shift in visual field preference after unilateral stroke. In: Brain and Cognition. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 361-373.
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