Application of a pressure servo system developed to study ventricular dynamics

J. S. Janicki, R. C. Reeves, Karl Weber, T. C. Donald, A. A. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A detailed assessment of mechanical ventricular performance could be obtained by controlling and measuring the loading conditions of the ventricle. Towards this end a series of pressure servo system prototypes which would provide such control were developed and tested in 28 biological experiments. The final prototype design, which utilizes an electrohydraulic actuator coupled to a piston with a maximum flow rate of 860 ml/s, is capable of maintaining the ejection pressure within ± 5 mmHg of the present systolic level. An intraventricular balloon is coupled to the piston and its volume is sensed by means of a slide wire potentiometer having a resolution of 0.2 ml. This final prototype was successfully applied using an isolated canine heart preparation perfused by either a closed loop membrane oxygenator or a support dog. In these experiments the system was evaluated under a variety of conditions, including left ventricular diastolic pressures from 0 to 30 mmHg, ejection pressures of 30 to 190 mmHg, and heart rates up to 200/min. The accuracy with which ventricular volume could be continuously measured, along with the ability to control ventricular volume and pressure in an isolated heart, provides a method for the quantification of left ventricular performance. (12 references).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)736-741
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume37
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1974

Fingerprint

Ventricular Pressure
Pressure
Membrane Oxygenators
Canidae
Heart Rate
Dogs
Blood Pressure
Isolated Heart Preparation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Janicki, J. S., Reeves, R. C., Weber, K., Donald, T. C., & Walker, A. A. (1974). Application of a pressure servo system developed to study ventricular dynamics. Journal of applied physiology, 37(5), 736-741.

Application of a pressure servo system developed to study ventricular dynamics. / Janicki, J. S.; Reeves, R. C.; Weber, Karl; Donald, T. C.; Walker, A. A.

In: Journal of applied physiology, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.12.1974, p. 736-741.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Janicki, JS, Reeves, RC, Weber, K, Donald, TC & Walker, AA 1974, 'Application of a pressure servo system developed to study ventricular dynamics', Journal of applied physiology, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 736-741.
Janicki, J. S. ; Reeves, R. C. ; Weber, Karl ; Donald, T. C. ; Walker, A. A. / Application of a pressure servo system developed to study ventricular dynamics. In: Journal of applied physiology. 1974 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 736-741.
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