Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting?

Debaroti Borschel, Carol E. Chenoweth, Samuel R. Kaufman, Kristi Vander Hyde, Kristen A. VanDerElzen, Trivellore E. Raghunathan, Curtis D. Collins, Sanjay Saint

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Catheter-related bloodstream infections are common, costly, and morbid. Randomized controlled trials indicate that antiseptic-coated central venous catheters reduce infection rates. Objective: To assess the clinical and economic effectiveness of antiseptic-coated catheters for critically ill patients in a real-world setting. Methods: Central venous catheters coated with chlorhexidine/silver-sulfadiazene were introduced in all patients requiring central venous access in adult intensive care units at the University of Michigan Health System, a large, tertiary care teaching hospital. A pretest-posttest cohort design measured the primary outcome of catheter-related bloodstream infection rate, comparing the 2 years prior to the intervention with the 2 years following the intervention. We also evaluated cost-effectiveness and changes in vancomycin use. Results: The intervention was associated with a 4% per month relative reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection, after controlling for the effects of time. Overall, a 35% relative risk reduction (P < .0003) in the catheter-related bloodstream infection rate occurred in the posttest phase. The use of antiseptic-coated catheters reduced costs more than $100,000 annually. Vancomycin use was less in units in which antiseptic catheters were used compared with wards in which these catheters were not used. Conclusion: Antiseptic-coated catheters appear to be clinically effective and economically efficient in a real-world setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-393
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Local Anti-Infective Agents
Central Venous Catheters
Catheter-Related Infections
Catheters
Vancomycin
Chlorhexidine
Tertiary Healthcare
Risk Reduction Behavior
Silver
Critical Illness
Teaching Hospitals
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Intensive Care Units
Randomized Controlled Trials
Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence
Health
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Borschel, D., Chenoweth, C. E., Kaufman, S. R., Hyde, K. V., VanDerElzen, K. A., Raghunathan, T. E., ... Saint, S. (2006). Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting? American Journal of Infection Control, 34(6), 388-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2005.08.004

Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting? / Borschel, Debaroti; Chenoweth, Carol E.; Kaufman, Samuel R.; Hyde, Kristi Vander; VanDerElzen, Kristen A.; Raghunathan, Trivellore E.; Collins, Curtis D.; Saint, Sanjay.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 34, No. 6, 01.08.2006, p. 388-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borschel, D, Chenoweth, CE, Kaufman, SR, Hyde, KV, VanDerElzen, KA, Raghunathan, TE, Collins, CD & Saint, S 2006, 'Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting?', American Journal of Infection Control, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 388-393. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2005.08.004
Borschel, Debaroti ; Chenoweth, Carol E. ; Kaufman, Samuel R. ; Hyde, Kristi Vander ; VanDerElzen, Kristen A. ; Raghunathan, Trivellore E. ; Collins, Curtis D. ; Saint, Sanjay. / Are antiseptic-coated central venous catheters effective in a real-world setting?. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2006 ; Vol. 34, No. 6. pp. 388-393.
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