Are bulb syringe irrigators a potential source of bacterial contamination in chronic rhinosinusitis?

Glenn B. Williams, Linda Ross, Rakesh K. Chandra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine if bulb syringe irrigators are a potential source for bacterial contamination in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Methods: Standard 3-oz bulb syringe irrigators (n = 24) were each flushed with the following solutions twice daily: A (n = 8), sterile isotonic saline; B (n = 8), prepared hypertonic saline (3 tsp table salt/ L of sterile water); and C (n = 8), prepared baking soda/saline (1 tsp table salt + 1 tsp baking soda/L of commercial sterile water). Syringes were stored on a residential bathroom counter, and two from each group were harvested for culture weekly for 4 weeks. Results: There was no growth from syringes irrigated with any of the three solutions after the first 7 days of irrigation. After the entire 4-week study period, potential pathogens were recovered from 6/8 (75%) bulbs from group A, 0/8 bulbs from group B, and 1/8 bulbs (12.5%) from group C. All positive cultures revealed growth by 1-2 days postinoculation (p = 0.002). The organism recovered from syringes in group A was Pseudomonas fluorescens in all six specimens. The one positive culture in group C represented a single colony of Gram-positive cocci. Conclusion: Under realistic conditions, bulb syringes are susceptible to contamination with potential bacterial pathogens, particularly when using unbuffered isotonic saline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-401
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Rhinology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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Syringes
Dietary Sodium Chloride
Sodium Bicarbonate
Toilet Facilities
Gram-Positive Cocci
Pseudomonas fluorescens
Water
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Are bulb syringe irrigators a potential source of bacterial contamination in chronic rhinosinusitis? / Williams, Glenn B.; Ross, Linda; Chandra, Rakesh K.

In: American Journal of Rhinology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.07.2008, p. 399-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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