Are Preferences for Aggressive Medical Treatment Associated with Healthcare Utilization in the Very Old?

Steven M. Albert, June R. Lunney, Lei Ye, Robert Boudreau, DIane Ives, Suzanne Satterfield, Cameron Kaplan, Teresa Waters, Hilsa N. Ayonayon, Susan M. Rubin, Anne B. Newman, Tamara Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the relationship between end-of-life (EOL) treatment preferences and recent hospitalization or emergency department (ED) care in the very old. Design: Quarterly telephone follow-up of participants in the EOL in the Very Old cohort. Setting: The EOL in the Very Old Age cohort drew from 1403 participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) study who were alive in year 15 of follow-up. 87.5% (n = 1227) were successfully recontacted and enrolled. Participants: Preferences for treatment at the EOL and reported hospital and ED use were examined for 1118 participants (18% involving proxy reports) over 6 months, 1021 (16% with proxy reports) over 12 months, and 945 (23% with proxy reports) over 18 months in 6-month intervals. Measurements: Preferences for eight EOL treatments, elicited once each year; hospitalization and ED use reported every six months. Results: Preferences for more aggressive treatment (endorsing ≥5 of 8 options) were not significantly associated with inpatient or ED treatment. Inpatient and ED treatment were not associated with changes in preferences for aggressive EOL treatment over 12 months. Conclusion: Alternative measures that tap attitudes toward routine care, rather than EOL treatment preferences, may be more highly associated with healthcare utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-624
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Hospital Emergency Service
Delivery of Health Care
Proxy
Emergency Treatment
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Therapeutics
Terminal Care
Hospital Departments
Emergency Medical Services
Body Composition
Telephone
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Albert, S. M., Lunney, J. R., Ye, L., Boudreau, R., Ives, DI., Satterfield, S., ... Harris, T. (2017). Are Preferences for Aggressive Medical Treatment Associated with Healthcare Utilization in the Very Old? Journal of Palliative Medicine, 20(6), 618-624. https://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2016.0284

Are Preferences for Aggressive Medical Treatment Associated with Healthcare Utilization in the Very Old? / Albert, Steven M.; Lunney, June R.; Ye, Lei; Boudreau, Robert; Ives, DIane; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kaplan, Cameron; Waters, Teresa; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Rubin, Susan M.; Newman, Anne B.; Harris, Tamara.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 618-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Albert, SM, Lunney, JR, Ye, L, Boudreau, R, Ives, DI, Satterfield, S, Kaplan, C, Waters, T, Ayonayon, HN, Rubin, SM, Newman, AB & Harris, T 2017, 'Are Preferences for Aggressive Medical Treatment Associated with Healthcare Utilization in the Very Old?', Journal of Palliative Medicine, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 618-624. https://doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2016.0284
Albert, Steven M. ; Lunney, June R. ; Ye, Lei ; Boudreau, Robert ; Ives, DIane ; Satterfield, Suzanne ; Kaplan, Cameron ; Waters, Teresa ; Ayonayon, Hilsa N. ; Rubin, Susan M. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Harris, Tamara. / Are Preferences for Aggressive Medical Treatment Associated with Healthcare Utilization in the Very Old?. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 618-624.
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