Asociation between type of medication instruction and patients' knowledge, side effects, and compliance

Candace Brown, R. G. Wright, D. B. Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors measured knowledge about medication and its side effects, impact of side effects, and compliance in 30 chronic outpatients before and after they participated in two instruction sessions about their medication held one month apart. Instruction consisted of a verbal or a written and verbal presentation and minimum or maximum information about side effects. All patients' medication knowledge increased after both sessions. Those on high doses of neuroleptics given verbal and written information gained significantly more medication knowledge than those given only verbal information. After instruction, more patients knew about specific side effects, including tardive dyskinesia, and both patients given only verbal instruction and those given minimum information about side effects had fewer problems with side effects. Instruction did not affect compliance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-60
Number of pages6
JournalHospital and Community Psychiatry
Volume38
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Medication Knowledge
Compliance
Antipsychotic Agents
Outpatients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Asociation between type of medication instruction and patients' knowledge, side effects, and compliance. / Brown, Candace; Wright, R. G.; Christensen, D. B.

In: Hospital and Community Psychiatry, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.1987, p. 55-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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