Aspirin resistance

Disparities and clinical implications

Anita Airee, Heather M. Draper, Shannon Finks

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspirin is one of the most widely prescribed drugs for the prevention of thrombosis in patients with vascular disease. Yet, aspirin is unable to prevent thrombosis in all patients. The term "aspirin resistance" has been used to broadly define the failure of aspirin to prevent a thrombotic event. Whether this is directly related to aspirin itself through biochemical aspirin resistance or treatment failure, or if it is because of aspirin's inability to overcome the thrombogenic aspects of the disease process itself, has not been elucidated. This can have dramatic clinical implications for a variety of vascular disease subsets and is cause for concern, considering the high prevalence of aspirin use for both primary and secondary prevention. Disparities exist in the rates of aspirin resistance among certain patient populations, such as women, patients with diabetes mellitus, and those with heart failure, and across clinical conditions, such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Clinical trial data from studies observing resistance have revealed that regardless of study size, dose of aspirin, control for drug interactions and adherence, or assay used to measure platelet function, aspirin resistance is associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Although the evidence is mounting, there has yet to be a consensus on the appropriate clinical response to aspirin resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1018
Number of pages20
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2008

Fingerprint

Aspirin
Vascular Diseases
Thrombosis
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Treatment Failure
Drug Interactions
Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Blood Platelets
Heart Failure
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Aspirin resistance : Disparities and clinical implications. / Airee, Anita; Draper, Heather M.; Finks, Shannon.

In: Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.08.2008, p. 999-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Airee, Anita ; Draper, Heather M. ; Finks, Shannon. / Aspirin resistance : Disparities and clinical implications. In: Pharmacotherapy. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 999-1018.
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