Assessing the impact of mobile technology on order verification during pharmacist participation in patient rounds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. Pharmacists' use of mobile technology (MT) to verify medication orders placed during their participation in medical rounds is investigated. Methods. A retrospective observational study was conducted at a large academic medical center to assess the impact of MT on the average time to pharmacist verification of medication orders written by general medicine staff during pharmacist participation in patient rounds. A total of 260 medication orders for 129 patients were evaluated: 146 orders processed over a one-month period during which rounding pharmacists verified orders using stationary computer terminals on patient care units and 114 orders processed using an MT device. The primary endpoint was the average time to pharmacist verification for all medication orders; average verification times for orders for specific medication classes (analgesics, antibiotics, antidiabetes drugs, and antihypertensives) were also evaluated. Results. Overall, the average time to order verification was significantly lower with the use of the MT device compared with non-MTassisted order verification (7.5 minutes versus 38.9 minutes, p < 0.001), with significant (p < 0.001) time benefits favoring MT-assisted verification for all order subsets within the evaluated medication classes. Challenges posed by the use of MT-assisted order verification included the selected device's relatively small keyboard and the frequent loss of network connections as the pharmacist moved from floor to floor within the hospital. Conclusion. Clinical pharmacists' use of an MT device to verify medication orders written during patient care rounds can significantly decrease the average time required for order verification relative to the use of stationary computer terminals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-636
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Health-System Pharmacy
Volume70
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Patient Participation
Pharmacists
Technology
Computer Terminals
Equipment and Supplies
Patient Care
Antihypertensive Agents
Observational Studies
Analgesics
Retrospective Studies
Medicine
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Health Policy

Cite this

@article{33ba7af19425428285d7eea68a58d32b,
title = "Assessing the impact of mobile technology on order verification during pharmacist participation in patient rounds",
abstract = "Purpose. Pharmacists' use of mobile technology (MT) to verify medication orders placed during their participation in medical rounds is investigated. Methods. A retrospective observational study was conducted at a large academic medical center to assess the impact of MT on the average time to pharmacist verification of medication orders written by general medicine staff during pharmacist participation in patient rounds. A total of 260 medication orders for 129 patients were evaluated: 146 orders processed over a one-month period during which rounding pharmacists verified orders using stationary computer terminals on patient care units and 114 orders processed using an MT device. The primary endpoint was the average time to pharmacist verification for all medication orders; average verification times for orders for specific medication classes (analgesics, antibiotics, antidiabetes drugs, and antihypertensives) were also evaluated. Results. Overall, the average time to order verification was significantly lower with the use of the MT device compared with non-MTassisted order verification (7.5 minutes versus 38.9 minutes, p < 0.001), with significant (p < 0.001) time benefits favoring MT-assisted verification for all order subsets within the evaluated medication classes. Challenges posed by the use of MT-assisted order verification included the selected device's relatively small keyboard and the frequent loss of network connections as the pharmacist moved from floor to floor within the hospital. Conclusion. Clinical pharmacists' use of an MT device to verify medication orders written during patient care rounds can significantly decrease the average time required for order verification relative to the use of stationary computer terminals.",
author = "Shaunta' Chamberlin and Shirmil Clark and Julie Jeter and Sarah Eudaley",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2146/ajhp120219",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "633--636",
journal = "American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy",
issn = "1079-2082",
publisher = "American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacy",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing the impact of mobile technology on order verification during pharmacist participation in patient rounds

AU - Chamberlin, Shaunta'

AU - Clark, Shirmil

AU - Jeter, Julie

AU - Eudaley, Sarah

PY - 2013/4/1

Y1 - 2013/4/1

N2 - Purpose. Pharmacists' use of mobile technology (MT) to verify medication orders placed during their participation in medical rounds is investigated. Methods. A retrospective observational study was conducted at a large academic medical center to assess the impact of MT on the average time to pharmacist verification of medication orders written by general medicine staff during pharmacist participation in patient rounds. A total of 260 medication orders for 129 patients were evaluated: 146 orders processed over a one-month period during which rounding pharmacists verified orders using stationary computer terminals on patient care units and 114 orders processed using an MT device. The primary endpoint was the average time to pharmacist verification for all medication orders; average verification times for orders for specific medication classes (analgesics, antibiotics, antidiabetes drugs, and antihypertensives) were also evaluated. Results. Overall, the average time to order verification was significantly lower with the use of the MT device compared with non-MTassisted order verification (7.5 minutes versus 38.9 minutes, p < 0.001), with significant (p < 0.001) time benefits favoring MT-assisted verification for all order subsets within the evaluated medication classes. Challenges posed by the use of MT-assisted order verification included the selected device's relatively small keyboard and the frequent loss of network connections as the pharmacist moved from floor to floor within the hospital. Conclusion. Clinical pharmacists' use of an MT device to verify medication orders written during patient care rounds can significantly decrease the average time required for order verification relative to the use of stationary computer terminals.

AB - Purpose. Pharmacists' use of mobile technology (MT) to verify medication orders placed during their participation in medical rounds is investigated. Methods. A retrospective observational study was conducted at a large academic medical center to assess the impact of MT on the average time to pharmacist verification of medication orders written by general medicine staff during pharmacist participation in patient rounds. A total of 260 medication orders for 129 patients were evaluated: 146 orders processed over a one-month period during which rounding pharmacists verified orders using stationary computer terminals on patient care units and 114 orders processed using an MT device. The primary endpoint was the average time to pharmacist verification for all medication orders; average verification times for orders for specific medication classes (analgesics, antibiotics, antidiabetes drugs, and antihypertensives) were also evaluated. Results. Overall, the average time to order verification was significantly lower with the use of the MT device compared with non-MTassisted order verification (7.5 minutes versus 38.9 minutes, p < 0.001), with significant (p < 0.001) time benefits favoring MT-assisted verification for all order subsets within the evaluated medication classes. Challenges posed by the use of MT-assisted order verification included the selected device's relatively small keyboard and the frequent loss of network connections as the pharmacist moved from floor to floor within the hospital. Conclusion. Clinical pharmacists' use of an MT device to verify medication orders written during patient care rounds can significantly decrease the average time required for order verification relative to the use of stationary computer terminals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875422496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875422496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2146/ajhp120219

DO - 10.2146/ajhp120219

M3 - Article

C2 - 23515517

AN - SCOPUS:84875422496

VL - 70

SP - 633

EP - 636

JO - American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy

JF - American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy

SN - 1079-2082

IS - 7

ER -