Assessing the value of online learning and social media in pharmacy education

Leslie Hamilton, Andrea Franks, Robert Heidel, Sharon Mcdonough, Katie J. Suda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To assess student preferences regarding online learning and technology and to evaluate student pharmacists’ social media use for educational purposes. Methods. An anonymous 36-question online survey was administered to third-year student pharmacists enrolled in the Drug Information and Clinical Literature Evaluation course. Results. Four hundred thirty-one students completed the survey, yielding a 96% response rate. The majority of students used technology for academic activities, with 90% using smart phones and 91% using laptop computers. Fifty-eight percent of students also used social networking websites to communicate with classmates. Conclusion. Pharmacy students frequently use social media and some online learning methods, which could be a valuable avenue for delivering or supplementing pharmacy curricula. The potential role of social media and online learning in pharmacy education needs to be further explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number97
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume80
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Pharmacy Education
Social Media
social media
Learning
Students
learning
Values
education
student
Pharmacists
pharmacist
Social Networking
Pharmacy Students
Technology
Curriculum
learning method
online survey
networking
website
drug

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Assessing the value of online learning and social media in pharmacy education. / Hamilton, Leslie; Franks, Andrea; Heidel, Robert; Mcdonough, Sharon; Suda, Katie J.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 80, No. 6, 97, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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