Assessment of blood pressure control in hypertensive stroke survivors: An ambulatory blood pressure monitoring study

Nikolaos Zakopoulos, Konstantinos Spengos, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Vassilios Zis, Efstathios Manios, Konstantinos Vemmos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We compared the sensitivity of office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment and identified factors related to inadequate blood pressure control among hypertensive stroke survivors. METHODS: Office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring measurements were performed at 120±30 days after ictus in 187 first-ever consecutive hypertensive stroke survivors who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medications according to international guidelines. Handicap was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale. Blood pressure was regarded as controlled if office and daytime ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were <140/90 and <135/85 mmHg, respectively. Patients were subclassified according to the degree of their nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall [(mean daytime values-mean night-time values)100/mean daytime values] as dippers (≥10%), nondippers (≥0% and<10%) and reverse dippers (<0%). RESULTS: Effective blood pressure control was documented in significantly (P<0.001) fewer patients using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (32.1%) than those using office recordings (43.3%), whereas in 16% of the study population a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control (elevated ambulatory blood pressure in the presence of normal office blood pressure levels) was identified. The distribution of dipping patterns differed significantly (P=0.01) between controlled hypertensive individuals (normal office and ambulatory measurements) and patients with isolated ambulatory hypertension (dippers: 31.3 vs. 10.0%; nondippers:56.9 vs. 53.3%; reverse dippers: 11.8 vs. 36.7%). Logistic regression analysis revealed diabetes mellitus and functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score <2) as independent predictors of inadequate blood pressure control. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detects a substantial number of treated hypertensive stroke survivors with a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control, who present a higher prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure patterns (reverse dipping). Diabetes mellitus and poststroke functional independency are the main factors contributing to inadequate blood pressure control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-241
Number of pages7
JournalBlood Pressure Monitoring
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Survivors
Stroke
Blood Pressure
Diabetes Mellitus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Assessment of blood pressure control in hypertensive stroke survivors : An ambulatory blood pressure monitoring study. / Zakopoulos, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Zis, Vassilios; Manios, Efstathios; Vemmos, Konstantinos.

In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, Vol. 11, No. 5, 10.2006, p. 235-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zakopoulos, Nikolaos ; Spengos, Konstantinos ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Zis, Vassilios ; Manios, Efstathios ; Vemmos, Konstantinos. / Assessment of blood pressure control in hypertensive stroke survivors : An ambulatory blood pressure monitoring study. In: Blood Pressure Monitoring. 2006 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 235-241.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: We compared the sensitivity of office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment and identified factors related to inadequate blood pressure control among hypertensive stroke survivors. METHODS: Office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring measurements were performed at 120±30 days after ictus in 187 first-ever consecutive hypertensive stroke survivors who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medications according to international guidelines. Handicap was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale. Blood pressure was regarded as controlled if office and daytime ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were <140/90 and <135/85 mmHg, respectively. Patients were subclassified according to the degree of their nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall [(mean daytime values-mean night-time values)100/mean daytime values] as dippers (≥10{\%}), nondippers (≥0{\%} and<10{\%}) and reverse dippers (<0{\%}). RESULTS: Effective blood pressure control was documented in significantly (P<0.001) fewer patients using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (32.1{\%}) than those using office recordings (43.3{\%}), whereas in 16{\%} of the study population a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control (elevated ambulatory blood pressure in the presence of normal office blood pressure levels) was identified. The distribution of dipping patterns differed significantly (P=0.01) between controlled hypertensive individuals (normal office and ambulatory measurements) and patients with isolated ambulatory hypertension (dippers: 31.3 vs. 10.0{\%}; nondippers:56.9 vs. 53.3{\%}; reverse dippers: 11.8 vs. 36.7{\%}). Logistic regression analysis revealed diabetes mellitus and functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score <2) as independent predictors of inadequate blood pressure control. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detects a substantial number of treated hypertensive stroke survivors with a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control, who present a higher prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure patterns (reverse dipping). Diabetes mellitus and poststroke functional independency are the main factors contributing to inadequate blood pressure control.",
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AU - Zakopoulos, Nikolaos

AU - Spengos, Konstantinos

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AU - Zis, Vassilios

AU - Manios, Efstathios

AU - Vemmos, Konstantinos

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N2 - BACKGROUND: We compared the sensitivity of office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment and identified factors related to inadequate blood pressure control among hypertensive stroke survivors. METHODS: Office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring measurements were performed at 120±30 days after ictus in 187 first-ever consecutive hypertensive stroke survivors who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medications according to international guidelines. Handicap was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale. Blood pressure was regarded as controlled if office and daytime ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were <140/90 and <135/85 mmHg, respectively. Patients were subclassified according to the degree of their nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall [(mean daytime values-mean night-time values)100/mean daytime values] as dippers (≥10%), nondippers (≥0% and<10%) and reverse dippers (<0%). RESULTS: Effective blood pressure control was documented in significantly (P<0.001) fewer patients using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (32.1%) than those using office recordings (43.3%), whereas in 16% of the study population a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control (elevated ambulatory blood pressure in the presence of normal office blood pressure levels) was identified. The distribution of dipping patterns differed significantly (P=0.01) between controlled hypertensive individuals (normal office and ambulatory measurements) and patients with isolated ambulatory hypertension (dippers: 31.3 vs. 10.0%; nondippers:56.9 vs. 53.3%; reverse dippers: 11.8 vs. 36.7%). Logistic regression analysis revealed diabetes mellitus and functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score <2) as independent predictors of inadequate blood pressure control. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detects a substantial number of treated hypertensive stroke survivors with a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control, who present a higher prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure patterns (reverse dipping). Diabetes mellitus and poststroke functional independency are the main factors contributing to inadequate blood pressure control.

AB - BACKGROUND: We compared the sensitivity of office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in evaluating the effectiveness of antihypertensive treatment and identified factors related to inadequate blood pressure control among hypertensive stroke survivors. METHODS: Office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring measurements were performed at 120±30 days after ictus in 187 first-ever consecutive hypertensive stroke survivors who were receiving blood pressure-lowering medications according to international guidelines. Handicap was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale. Blood pressure was regarded as controlled if office and daytime ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were <140/90 and <135/85 mmHg, respectively. Patients were subclassified according to the degree of their nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall [(mean daytime values-mean night-time values)100/mean daytime values] as dippers (≥10%), nondippers (≥0% and<10%) and reverse dippers (<0%). RESULTS: Effective blood pressure control was documented in significantly (P<0.001) fewer patients using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (32.1%) than those using office recordings (43.3%), whereas in 16% of the study population a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control (elevated ambulatory blood pressure in the presence of normal office blood pressure levels) was identified. The distribution of dipping patterns differed significantly (P=0.01) between controlled hypertensive individuals (normal office and ambulatory measurements) and patients with isolated ambulatory hypertension (dippers: 31.3 vs. 10.0%; nondippers:56.9 vs. 53.3%; reverse dippers: 11.8 vs. 36.7%). Logistic regression analysis revealed diabetes mellitus and functional independency (modified Rankin Scale score <2) as independent predictors of inadequate blood pressure control. CONCLUSION: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detects a substantial number of treated hypertensive stroke survivors with a masked lack of per-treatment blood pressure control, who present a higher prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure patterns (reverse dipping). Diabetes mellitus and poststroke functional independency are the main factors contributing to inadequate blood pressure control.

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