Assessment of inpatient admissions and top 25 medications for obese pediatric patients at two academic hospitals

Peter N. Johnson, Jamie L. Miller, Tracy Hagemann, Brady S. Moffett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. Inpatient admissions and the top 25 medications for obese pediatric patients at two academic hospitals were assessed. Methods. Children age 2-17 years were included if they were obese and admitted to either hospital on or after January 1, 2011, and discharged before December 31, 2011. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of ≥95th percentile for age and sex. The objectives of this study were to determine the percentage of hospital admissions involving obese children and compile a list of medications prescribed to these patients. The top 25 medications prescribed were further evaluated to determine their pharmacokinetic disposition in obese patients. Results. Obese children accounted for 18.8% of the 15,119 admissions for children age 2-17 years at the two study hospitals. No significant difference was noted in the number of obese pediatric children admitted between institutions. A total of 28,234 medications were ordered for this population, with a median number of 8 medications prescribed per admission. Sixteen of the same medications (64.0%) ranked in the top 25 at each facility. The most commonly prescribed medications for these patients included analgesics, antimicrobials, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and gastrointestinal agents. Conclusion. Obese children accounted for 18.8% of admissions for patients age 2-17 years at two academic hospitals over a 1-year period. The most commonly prescribed medications for these children included analgesics, antimicrobials, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and gastrointestinal agents. The literature guiding the dosing of these medications in this population was limited to seven studies, representing just three medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1243-1249
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health-System Pharmacy
Volume73
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Inpatients
Pediatrics
Gastrointestinal Agents
Bronchodilator Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Analgesics
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Patient Admission
Population
Body Mass Index
Pharmacokinetics
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Health Policy

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Assessment of inpatient admissions and top 25 medications for obese pediatric patients at two academic hospitals. / Johnson, Peter N.; Miller, Jamie L.; Hagemann, Tracy; Moffett, Brady S.

In: American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, Vol. 73, No. 16, 15.08.2016, p. 1243-1249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose. Inpatient admissions and the top 25 medications for obese pediatric patients at two academic hospitals were assessed. Methods. Children age 2-17 years were included if they were obese and admitted to either hospital on or after January 1, 2011, and discharged before December 31, 2011. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of ≥95th percentile for age and sex. The objectives of this study were to determine the percentage of hospital admissions involving obese children and compile a list of medications prescribed to these patients. The top 25 medications prescribed were further evaluated to determine their pharmacokinetic disposition in obese patients. Results. Obese children accounted for 18.8{\%} of the 15,119 admissions for children age 2-17 years at the two study hospitals. No significant difference was noted in the number of obese pediatric children admitted between institutions. A total of 28,234 medications were ordered for this population, with a median number of 8 medications prescribed per admission. Sixteen of the same medications (64.0{\%}) ranked in the top 25 at each facility. The most commonly prescribed medications for these patients included analgesics, antimicrobials, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and gastrointestinal agents. Conclusion. Obese children accounted for 18.8{\%} of admissions for patients age 2-17 years at two academic hospitals over a 1-year period. The most commonly prescribed medications for these children included analgesics, antimicrobials, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and gastrointestinal agents. The literature guiding the dosing of these medications in this population was limited to seven studies, representing just three medications.",
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