Assessment of the effect of chemical agents used in dentistry on the removal of Porphyromonas gingivalis and escherichia coli from sandblasted acid-etched titanium dental implants

An in vitro study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of chemicals to decontaminate Escherichia coli (E coli) or Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) from sandblasted acid-etched (SAE) titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: SAE titanium dental implants were contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis and incubated in a sterile bacterial culture media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The implants were treated with 10 different conditions: calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] paste for 1 minute and saline irrigation for 1 minute; Ca(OH)2 paste for 1 minute and 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHXD) irrigation for 1 minute; 0.2% CHXD for 1 minute; Dakin's solution for 1 minute; tetracycline hydrochloride (T-HCl) as a 1 g per 20 mL solution for 1, 2, and 3 minutes; and T-HCl paste for 1, 2, and 3 minutes. All implants were irrigated with 1 mL of saline solution and incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 24 hours or 48 hours for E coli- and P gingivalis-contaminated implants, respectively. The control group was submitted to all procedures except for the chemical treatments. Aliquots were removed, and turbidity was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of bacterial growth in control cultures was considered to have a decontamination percentage (DC%) of 0. Results: Spectrophotometric analysis showed that all chemical treatments resulted in significantly higher DC% compared to controls for SAE implants contaminated with E coli (P < .05) or P gingivalis (P < .05). For the P gingivalis experiments, SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution had a lower DC% (39.3%) than those in the other treatment groups. In the E coli experiments, DC% was significantly lower for SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution (48.7%), Dakin's solution (92.7%), or T-HCl paste for 1 minute (96.6%) than those in the other groups. Conclusion: The DC% of SAE implants contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis by means of chemicals commonly used in dentistry is high, with the exception of Ca(OH)2 paste burnished for 1 minute and then irrigated with saline solution for 1 minute.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-307
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Porphyromonas gingivalis
Dental Implants
Ointments
Dentistry
Titanium
Escherichia coli
Acids
Sodium Chloride
Tetracycline
Calcium Hydroxide
Decontamination
Spectrophotometry
In Vitro Techniques
Culture Media
Control Groups
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

@article{cf46531424ce4c8fbff30beea4dc9a65,
title = "Assessment of the effect of chemical agents used in dentistry on the removal of Porphyromonas gingivalis and escherichia coli from sandblasted acid-etched titanium dental implants: An in vitro study",
abstract = "Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of chemicals to decontaminate Escherichia coli (E coli) or Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) from sandblasted acid-etched (SAE) titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: SAE titanium dental implants were contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis and incubated in a sterile bacterial culture media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The implants were treated with 10 different conditions: calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] paste for 1 minute and saline irrigation for 1 minute; Ca(OH)2 paste for 1 minute and 0.2{\%} chlorhexidine digluconate (CHXD) irrigation for 1 minute; 0.2{\%} CHXD for 1 minute; Dakin's solution for 1 minute; tetracycline hydrochloride (T-HCl) as a 1 g per 20 mL solution for 1, 2, and 3 minutes; and T-HCl paste for 1, 2, and 3 minutes. All implants were irrigated with 1 mL of saline solution and incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 24 hours or 48 hours for E coli- and P gingivalis-contaminated implants, respectively. The control group was submitted to all procedures except for the chemical treatments. Aliquots were removed, and turbidity was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of bacterial growth in control cultures was considered to have a decontamination percentage (DC{\%}) of 0. Results: Spectrophotometric analysis showed that all chemical treatments resulted in significantly higher DC{\%} compared to controls for SAE implants contaminated with E coli (P < .05) or P gingivalis (P < .05). For the P gingivalis experiments, SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution had a lower DC{\%} (39.3{\%}) than those in the other treatment groups. In the E coli experiments, DC{\%} was significantly lower for SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution (48.7{\%}), Dakin's solution (92.7{\%}), or T-HCl paste for 1 minute (96.6{\%}) than those in the other groups. Conclusion: The DC{\%} of SAE implants contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis by means of chemicals commonly used in dentistry is high, with the exception of Ca(OH)2 paste burnished for 1 minute and then irrigated with saline solution for 1 minute.",
author = "Cimara Ferreira and Jegdish Babu and David Tipton and Timothy Hottel",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.11607/jomi.3703",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "299--307",
journal = "International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants",
issn = "0882-2786",
publisher = "Quintessence Publishing Company",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessment of the effect of chemical agents used in dentistry on the removal of Porphyromonas gingivalis and escherichia coli from sandblasted acid-etched titanium dental implants

T2 - An in vitro study

AU - Ferreira, Cimara

AU - Babu, Jegdish

AU - Tipton, David

AU - Hottel, Timothy

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of chemicals to decontaminate Escherichia coli (E coli) or Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) from sandblasted acid-etched (SAE) titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: SAE titanium dental implants were contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis and incubated in a sterile bacterial culture media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The implants were treated with 10 different conditions: calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] paste for 1 minute and saline irrigation for 1 minute; Ca(OH)2 paste for 1 minute and 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHXD) irrigation for 1 minute; 0.2% CHXD for 1 minute; Dakin's solution for 1 minute; tetracycline hydrochloride (T-HCl) as a 1 g per 20 mL solution for 1, 2, and 3 minutes; and T-HCl paste for 1, 2, and 3 minutes. All implants were irrigated with 1 mL of saline solution and incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 24 hours or 48 hours for E coli- and P gingivalis-contaminated implants, respectively. The control group was submitted to all procedures except for the chemical treatments. Aliquots were removed, and turbidity was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of bacterial growth in control cultures was considered to have a decontamination percentage (DC%) of 0. Results: Spectrophotometric analysis showed that all chemical treatments resulted in significantly higher DC% compared to controls for SAE implants contaminated with E coli (P < .05) or P gingivalis (P < .05). For the P gingivalis experiments, SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution had a lower DC% (39.3%) than those in the other treatment groups. In the E coli experiments, DC% was significantly lower for SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution (48.7%), Dakin's solution (92.7%), or T-HCl paste for 1 minute (96.6%) than those in the other groups. Conclusion: The DC% of SAE implants contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis by means of chemicals commonly used in dentistry is high, with the exception of Ca(OH)2 paste burnished for 1 minute and then irrigated with saline solution for 1 minute.

AB - Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of chemicals to decontaminate Escherichia coli (E coli) or Porphyromonas gingivalis (P gingivalis) from sandblasted acid-etched (SAE) titanium dental implants. Materials and Methods: SAE titanium dental implants were contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis and incubated in a sterile bacterial culture media under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The implants were treated with 10 different conditions: calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] paste for 1 minute and saline irrigation for 1 minute; Ca(OH)2 paste for 1 minute and 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHXD) irrigation for 1 minute; 0.2% CHXD for 1 minute; Dakin's solution for 1 minute; tetracycline hydrochloride (T-HCl) as a 1 g per 20 mL solution for 1, 2, and 3 minutes; and T-HCl paste for 1, 2, and 3 minutes. All implants were irrigated with 1 mL of saline solution and incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 24 hours or 48 hours for E coli- and P gingivalis-contaminated implants, respectively. The control group was submitted to all procedures except for the chemical treatments. Aliquots were removed, and turbidity was measured by spectrophotometry. The level of bacterial growth in control cultures was considered to have a decontamination percentage (DC%) of 0. Results: Spectrophotometric analysis showed that all chemical treatments resulted in significantly higher DC% compared to controls for SAE implants contaminated with E coli (P < .05) or P gingivalis (P < .05). For the P gingivalis experiments, SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution had a lower DC% (39.3%) than those in the other treatment groups. In the E coli experiments, DC% was significantly lower for SAE implants treated with Ca(OH)2 paste and saline solution (48.7%), Dakin's solution (92.7%), or T-HCl paste for 1 minute (96.6%) than those in the other groups. Conclusion: The DC% of SAE implants contaminated with E coli or P gingivalis by means of chemicals commonly used in dentistry is high, with the exception of Ca(OH)2 paste burnished for 1 minute and then irrigated with saline solution for 1 minute.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84953733386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84953733386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.11607/jomi.3703

DO - 10.11607/jomi.3703

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 299

EP - 307

JO - International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants

JF - International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants

SN - 0882-2786

IS - 2

ER -