Assessment of the tumorigenic potential of spontaneously immortalized and hTERT immortalized cultured dental pulp stem cells

Ryan Wilson, Nora Urraca, Cezary Skobowiat, Kevin A. Hope, Leticia Miravalle, Reed Chamberlin, Martin Donaldson, Tiffany Seagroves, Lawrence Reiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) provide an exciting new avenue to study neurogenetic disorders. DPSCs are neural crest-derived cells with the ability to differentiate into numerous tissues including neurons. The therapeutic potential of stemcell-derived lines exposed to culturing ex vivo before reintroduction into patients could be limited if the cultured cells acquired tumorigenic potential. We tested whether DPSCs that spontaneously immortalized in culture acquired features of transformed cells. We analyzed immortalized DPSCs for anchorage-independent growth, genomic instability, and ability to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we tested both spontaneously immortalized and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized DPSC lines for the ability to form tumors in immunocompromised animals. Although we observed increased colony-forming potential in soft agar for the spontaneously immortalized and hTERT-immortalized DPSC lines relative to lowpassage DPSC, no tumors were detected from any of the DPSC lines tested. We noticed some genomic instability in hTERT-immortalized DPSCs but not in the spontaneously immortalized lines tested. We determined that immortalized DPSC lines generated in our laboratory, whether spontaneously or induced, have not acquired the potential to form tumors in mice. These data suggest cultured DPSC lines that can be differentiated into neurons may be safe for future in vivo therapy for neurobiological diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)905-912
Number of pages8
JournalStem Cells Translational Medicine
Volume4
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2015

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Dental Pulp
Stem Cells
Cell Line
Genomic Instability
Neurons
human TERT protein
Neural Stem Cells
Neoplastic Stem Cells
Neural Crest
Agar
Cultured Cells
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Assessment of the tumorigenic potential of spontaneously immortalized and hTERT immortalized cultured dental pulp stem cells. / Wilson, Ryan; Urraca, Nora; Skobowiat, Cezary; Hope, Kevin A.; Miravalle, Leticia; Chamberlin, Reed; Donaldson, Martin; Seagroves, Tiffany; Reiter, Lawrence.

In: Stem Cells Translational Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 8, 27.07.2015, p. 905-912.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, Ryan ; Urraca, Nora ; Skobowiat, Cezary ; Hope, Kevin A. ; Miravalle, Leticia ; Chamberlin, Reed ; Donaldson, Martin ; Seagroves, Tiffany ; Reiter, Lawrence. / Assessment of the tumorigenic potential of spontaneously immortalized and hTERT immortalized cultured dental pulp stem cells. In: Stem Cells Translational Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 8. pp. 905-912.
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